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Jewish World Review August 19, 2002 / 11 Elul, 5762

Phil Perrier

Phil Perrier
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Consumer Reports


In this game, nobody
wants a souvenir!


http://www.NewsAndOpinion.com | "We always thought he was joking. But he made it clear he was serious. He wanted us to use his ashes in making some Frisbees. He even said he hopes we throw them around in his honor."

So said Dr. Daniel Headrick about the final arrangements for his late father, Edward "Steady Ed" Headrick, known as the father of frisbee golf.

Ed Headrick joined WHAM-O Inc., during the 1950s and received a patent for his new, improved, design for the Frisbee. During the 1970s Headrick invented disc golf; based on actual golf, disc golf involves tossing discs into metal baskets.

In 1982 Headrick left WHAM-O to promote disc sports fulltime.

"He lived for Frisbee," said Suzy Melin, widow of WHAM-O co-founder Spud Melin.

Headrick oversaw the opening of 800 disc golf courses worldwide and donated disc golf and Ultimate frisbee supplies to youth in underpriveleged areas. Headrick was attending a Frisbee tournament when he suffered a fatal stroke, at age 78.

Why shouldn't Ed Headrick's ashes be used to "make some Frisbees?" It's not like his kids want to cryogenically freeze him.

"People want their ashes to float around the oceans, and nobody thinks anything is weird about that," argues Daniel Headrick.

But, there could be a problem. A WHAM-O spokesman said the ash-Frisbee idea may not be "technologically feasible."

Which, in corporate speak really means "Eeeww!... gross!... ashes in Frisbees... yuck!"

However, WHAM-O marketing Director Peter Sgromo said "We would certainly consider creating a disc in his honor."

It doesn't sound like that is going to be quite good enough for the Headricks though. "My father would be really happy if we actually played Frisbee with his remains," vows Daniel. So one way or another, Headrick's four offspring will make it happen.

"He said he wanted to end up in a Frisbee that accidentally lands on someone's roof."

Does wanting to be made into Frisbees make "Steady Ed" Headrick crazy?

YES!

But people used to look at me like I was crazy when I told people I was going to play Frisbee golf. "What's that?" they would ask.

Or, they would just walk away quickly.

But I loved Frisbee golf; outdoors, fresh air, beautiful scenery, the challenge of breaking par. They are fond memories, or at least they would be if I didn't smoke 11 joints before every round. (Uh, just kidding)

I haven't played in years. This weekend would be a good time to toss a few.

Toss a few and have a few laughs, in honor of Steady Ed Headrick.

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JWR contributor Phil Perrier is a Los Angeles-based writer and stand-up comic. Comment by clicking here.

Up

08/08/02: Drawing the curtain on a 'forgiven' lifestyle
07/29/02: The end of the freak show?
07/03/02: Who died?
06/21/02: From death, life
04/09/02: Welcome back, Phil
03/21/02: The Hollywood Curmudgeon's Guide to the Oscars
02/15/02: Another piece of Americana bites the dust
01/18/02: I'M SPARTACUS!
12/31/01: Realistic New Year's resolutions
12/21/01: SAY IT AIN'T SO, GERALDO!
11/02/01: Return to narcissism with Emmys
10/19/01: White trash exchange program
10/01/01: A few shows that will not be on the fall lineup
09/25/01: What's important
09/20/01: A sleeping giant awakes

© 2002, Phil Perrier