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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 25, 2013 / 17 Tammuz, 5773

Dems Struggle With Scandals; GOP Can't Agree on Policy

By Michael Barone




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The two political parties are in disarray. The Democrats are disheartened. The Republicans are disunited.

Start with (because they're first in alphabetical order) the Democrats. The Barack Obama they were so enthusiastic about in 2008 has been disappointing many of them lately.

Not many happy Obama voters envisioned last November that his presidency would be faced with multiple scandals six months later.

During the campaign most of the media provided voters with little information about the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans in Benghazi.

But now it's apparent to anyone paying attention that Obama and Hillary Clinton repeatedly misled Americans about the nature of the attack and their response.

Strong partisans try to ignore that kind of information about their leader. But it's getting harder to do so.

It's even harder to ignore the Justice Department's actions against The Associated Press and Fox News's James Rosen. (Disclosure: I'm a Fox News contributor.)

As for the Internal Revenue Service's targeting of conservative groups, prominent Democratic officeholders, including Obama, have appropriately condemned it. Polls suggest that most Democratic voters take that view, as well.

I have seen no evidence yet that anyone in the White House ordered the targeting. But it does seem peculiar that IRS Commissioner Douglas Shulman and his chief of staff attended hundreds of meetings in the White House complex.

And then there's the news that the National Security Agency has been data mining and intercepting communications between suspected terrorists abroad and persons in the United States.

The latter used to be called "domestic wiretapping" during the Bush administration. Barack Obama denounced it vigorously.

But as president he's kept it up and now, perfunctorily, defends it. History shows that there is more continuity to U.S. foreign and defense policy than partisan rhetoric suggests. But Democratic voters were led to expect discontinuity — "hope and change." Many are surely disheartened by this and by his decision to provide some arms to Syrian rebels.

Democrats' disillusion comes on top of some disenchantment during Obama's first term. Sluggish economy growth and the unpopularity of Obamacare contributed to that.

It's been little noticed, but Obama got 3.6 million fewer votes in 2012 than he did in 2008. In contrast, George W. Bush was re-elected with 11.6 million more votes than he won four years before.

Obama's job approval now is just about identical to Bush's at this point in his second term. It may not fall as far as Bush's did. But the numbers and the news don't suggest that Democrats will flock enthusiastically to the polls in 2014 and 2016.

At the same time, it's not apparent that Republican voters are taking heart from these developments. Their party seems divided even more than is usual for a party that's been out of the White House for five years.

Republicans are split on immigration, with Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida rallying the Senate Gang of Eight bill and other Republicans denouncing it as amnesty. They're divided, as we saw in the House last week, on the farm/food stamps bill.

They're divided especially on foreign policy. Sen. John McCain of Arizona and others labeled as neoconservatives have long called for military aid — perhaps a no-fly zone — for the Syrian rebels. They've defended the administration's surveillance programs.

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, who has been shrewdly seeking attention, takes an opposite view. He's against involvement in the Middle East and decries the use of drones and data mining.

Republicans had a weak field of presidential candidates in 2012, and the strongest of them, Mitt Romney, won only 1 million more votes than McCain had in 2008.

The party seems likely to have a much stronger field in 2016 — and one with a wide range of positions and platforms.

House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin has put forward fiscal plans that have been backed by almost all House Republicans. But there could still be wide disagreement on economic issues in the presidential primaries.

There could be disagreement on health care, as well. No one is sure how the rollout of Obamacare will go. It could be a disaster, or it could produce just minor "glitches and bumps," in the president's words.

Republican politicians are united in opposing Obamacare. They are, unsurprisingly, not united on how to respond to a rollout that hasn't happened yet.

Often one of the two major parties is in disarray. Today, unusually, both of them are.


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JWR contributor Michael Barone is senior political analyst for The Washington Examiner.




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