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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 26, 2009 / 1 Nisan 5769

The Geithner Paradox: Unregulated Institutions Bailing Out Regulated Ones

By Michael Barone


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Bill Galston at the New Republic's blog provides some clear thinking on the prospects for the Obama administration's cap-and-trade legislation. His conclusion: ain't gonna happen. Galston notes that national polls show that on the question of balancing economic against environmental considerations, voters have switched and are now more concerned about the economy—as in holding down utility costs—and less concerned about the environment.

And, as Galston points out, a cap-and-trade system would substantially increase the price of electricity produced by coal. Nationally, we get 49 percent of our energy by coal (these are 2006 figures, from the 2009 Statistical Abstract of the United States), but reliance on coal varies widely by state. The following table may help you to understand the political implications. It shows the percentage of electricity produced by coal in each state above the national average and the number of Democratic senators and representatives from each of those states.

% of electricity produced by coal in each state above the national average senators representatives
Alabama 55 0 2
Colorado 71 2 5
Delaware 69 2 0
Georgia 63 0 6
Indiana 95 1 5
Iowa 76 1 3
Kansas 73 0 1
Kentucky 92 0 2
Maryland 60 2 7
Michigan 60 2 8
Minnesota 62 1 5
Missouri  84 1 4
Montana 60 2 0
Nebraska 65 1 0
New Mexico 80 2 3
North Carolina 60 1 8
North Dakota 93 2 1
Ohio 86 1 10
Oklahoma 50 0 1
Pennsylvania 56 1 12
Tennessee 65 0 5
Utah 89 0 1
West Virginia 97 2 2
Wisconsin 65 2 5
Wyoming 94 0 0
TOTAL   26 96

 

Do the math. That leaves only 32 Democratic senators from less-than-average coal-reliant states and only 157 Democratic House members from less-than-average coal-reliant states. Now I'm not saying that every member from such states will vote against cap-and-trade, but I think an awful lot would. And I don't think many Republicans are going to vote for cap-and-trade. In his press conference last night, Barack Obama seemed to accept the Senate Budget Committee's Democrats' decision to jettison the money for cap-and-trade and expressed a wistful hope that something might be done later. But even in better economic times, the numbers tend to work against any such proposal.

It's interesting to see how different states are dependent on different kinds of energy. Nationally, 49 percent of our electricity comes from coal, 20 percent from natural gas, 19 percent from nuclear power, 7 percent from hydroelectric power and 2 percent from petroleum. We've seen which states are more likely to depend on coal; let's look at the other fuels.

Heavy dependence on natural gas is scattered among four groups of states (I'll supply the percentage of electricity produced by that fuel in each case). One is in the West, where other fuels aren't readily available or where coal-fired plants would produce huge pollution in urban areas like Los Angeles and Denver: Nevada (66 percent), California (49 percent), Arizona (31 percent), Colorado (23 percent), Oregon (21 percent). A second area is in states with high natural gas production, where the fuel can be easily piped to power plants: Texas (49 percent), Oklahoma (47 percent), Louisiana (44 percent), Mississippi (34 percent). The third is in the Northeast, where there are liquefied natural gas ports or where transportation costs for other fuels are prohibitive: Rhode Island (97 percent), Massachusetts (51 percent), Maine (43 percent), New York (30 percent), Connecticut (30 percent), New Hampshire (27 percent), New Jersey (26 percent). The final group consists of one state, Florida (43 percent).

Nuclear power also tends to be concentrated in some states, like South Carolina (51 percent), where there is a big federal nuclear plant, and Illinois (49 percent), where Commonwealth Edison (now Exelon) under CEO Thomas Ayers, father of Barack Obama's onetime pal, unrepentant terrorist William Ayers, pursued an aggressive nuclear plant building program. Other states that get more than 30 percent of electricity from nuclear power: New Jersey (54 percent), Connecticut (48 percent), New Hampshire (43 percent), Virginia (38 percent), Pennsylvania (34 percent), North Carolina (32 percent). Note that all the states but South Carolina voted for Barack Obama; many of their members in Congress routinely vote against nuclear power.

Hydroelectric power is even more concentrated, in states with access to rapidly-flowing rivers with dams. The Columbia River basin leads the list: Idaho (84 percent), Washington (76 percent), Oregon (71 percent). With the Sierras, California (22 percent) is also on the list. The dams in South Dakota (48 percent) put it on the list. Far away are three other states with greater than average reliance on hydroelectric power: Maine (25 percent) with its old-fashioned dams, Vermont (21 percent), and New York (19 percent), which long ago tapped Niagara Falls. No other state, not even Tennessee with its TVA dams, relies on hydroelectric for more than 8 percent of its electricity.

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BARONE'S LATEST
The New Americans  

Now, more than ever, the melting pot must be used to keep America great. Barone attacks multiculturalism and anti-American apologists--but he also rejects proposals for building a wall to keep immigrants out, or rounding up millions of illegals to send back home. Rather, the melting pot must be allowed to work (as it has for centuries) to teach new Americans the values, history, and unique spirit of America so they, too, can enjoy the American dream.. Sales help fund JWR.

JWR contributor Michael Barone is a columnist at U.S. News & World Report. Comment by clicking here.




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