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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 22, 2013/ 12 Iyar, 5773

The wronged wife's say: What post-scandal comebacks still need

By Kathleen Parker

Kathleen Parker


JewishWorldReview.com | As the reporter said to the novelist: Why bother to make stuff up?

For stories and characters, one needs only a pair of walking shoes in this city, where recent attentions have turned to two salacious stories. One concerns a murder-for-hire plot involving a banker, his wife, his lover’s ex-husband and his ex-lover’s husband’s cellmate. Not to be confused with his soul mate.

No, that designation refers to the other story making rounds on the cocktail circuit. Yes, he’s back, but maybe not for long. Mark Sanford, the former governor who disappeared for five days, allegedly to hike the Appalachian Trail, only to find himself in the arms of his lover (now his fiancee), is discovering that not every kid gets a comeback.

What is it about the shamed male politician that he seems unable to accept when it’s over? This is strictly rhetorical, obviously. Part of the answer is hubris. Another part is history: Voters generally are forgiving once a person confesses and repents. But key to general forgiveness is the forgiveness of the wronged spouse. If Mrs. forgives, Joe and Jane Public usually do, too.

The list of those who have sinned and recovered is too long for this space, though a couple serve the point — and at least one deserves special mention: Bill Clinton.

Despite his well-known peccadilloes, the former president has become a respected global figure in the wake of his impeachment by the House of Representatives (the Senate failed to convict) on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice. His personal sins mostly forgiven, he has emerged with his popularity largely intact.

Perhaps the explanation lies in his overall likability as well as his good works through his foundation, not to mention a larger sense that he was unnecessarily persecuted for behaviors that were more or less familiar to (and ignored by) a majority of voters. At some point in the investigation, he became more sympathetic than his pursuers.

Clinton did not, moreover, seek public office again. And, significantly, Hillary, her early protestations notwithstanding, stood by her man.

Switch now to former New York representative Anthony Weiner, who left office after accidentally tweeting a photo of his assets to his Twitter followers. Despite unfathomable embarrassment, Weiner is considering a run for mayor of New York City. A recent poll shows him in second place in a hypothetical Democratic mayoral primary at 15 percent, behind City Council Speaker Christine Quinn at 26 percent.

Again, Weiner’s wife, who was pregnant at the time of his topple, stayed with him.

Lest Democrats feel unfairly singled out, we further note that Republican Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana has held his seat despite his intersection with prostitution. His longevity no doubt is attributable to his sincere repentance, constituent satisfaction and, importantly, his wife’s forgiveness.

Which brings us back to Sanford. Not only did he abandon his state for five days during his walkabout, but he committed the unthinkable. He wept. No taking it like a man, this one. Without consideration for his wife and young sons, he referred to his paramour as his soul mate.

Sanford didn’t even have the decency to resign from office but rather finished his term and vanished for a couple of years only to re-emerge in pursuit of a fresh legacy. He recently won the Republican primary for an open congressional seat and faces Elizabeth Colbert Busch (sister of TV’s Stephen Colbert) in a special election May 7.

To many South Carolinians, especially women, Sanford’s candidacy is an embarrassment of Weiner­esque proportions. But if history is any guide, his candidacy is on life support. Not only did his former wife, Jenny Sanford, not stand by her man, she also wrote a book, went on TV and recently took him to court for trespassing. This in the wake of his fiancee showing up at his primary victory party and appearing onstage with him and two of his sons, one of whom had not previously met his future stepmother.

Sanford’s lack of empathy for his family, not to mention his impeachable judgment, should disqualify him from further public service, an opinion apparently shared by the National Republican Congressional Committee, which recently withdrew support for his candidacy.

Where the wife goes, so go the people.

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