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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 11, 2011 / 7 Nisan, 5771

Demonizing the GOP, losing the budget battle

By Kathleen Parker

Kathleen Parker


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | So why do Republicans hate art, the elderly and children?

Hint: Same reason parents hate their children when they say, "No." We could just leave it at that, but this is too much fun.

The demonizing of Republicans for trying to seriously address our desperately ailing economy surely begs for a new metaphor. The GOP has become the army of Mordor, fat-gobbed predators who feed on children while destroying all that is beautiful in their relentless pursuit of greed.

Or so one would infer from the fiery rants emanating from the bowels of Capitol Hill and Hollywood.

"Why are the Republicans trying to kill the arts?" Chris Matthews on "Hardball" asked actor Kevin Spacey, who was in Washington to protest cuts to the arts. Elsewhere, actor Tim Robbins compared proposed cuts to an "old miserly man snatching a crayon out of a baby's hand."

He hoped that "more adult minds will prevail."

Indeed.

Everyone is calling for adults these days. President Obama insisted that Congress "act like grown-ups," adding that we don't have time for games. I'm not sure where these adults are going to come from since almost no one seems to want to be one. Meanwhile, the vocabulary of evil and apocalyptic imagery has punctuated criticism of the GOP's proposed 2012 budget, not to be confused with the 2011 budget.

It is helpful at this juncture to recall that Democrats failed to produce a budget last year, despite controlling the White House and both houses of Congress. But back to the end times:

Jonathan Chait at the New Republic declared the proposed GOP budget "wildly cruel," while Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex.) projected a biblical "no room at the inn" scenario with "lights out, doors wide open and the drumbeat playing as people are being rolled out of nursing homes in wheelchairs, with crutches, some on beds."

In the midst of so much hysteria, even some Republicans seem to have lost sight of the big picture. They've been scrambling over relative peanuts — a few billion dollars in a $3.8 trillion budget — while Democrats were setting the table for a feast. How delicious to blame Republicans for shutting down government.

At least some Republicans, perhaps over-caffeinated on tea, didn't seem to realize that they were winning the fiscal battle. They had succeeded in securing significant cuts to the 2011 budget and managed to produce a plan for 2012 that is widely regarded as visionary, if also very tough.

Rep. Paul Ryan's ambitious proposal is to cut $5.8 trillion from projected spending through fiscal 2021. The budget also cuts individual and corporate income taxes by more than $4 trillion below current projections.

Even hard-right conservatives have been missing the point. As one observer close to the action put it: "John Boehner has been playing chess while these guys [armchair Tea Party strategists] have been playing checkers."

Although no one expects this 2012 budget to pass the Democrat-controlled Senate, it is a blueprint for the debate that must take place about what role government should play in Americans' lives. We may not all agree on all its pieces — what's new? — but we can surely find a way to debate without summoning the devil to the table.

Meanwhile, Republicans may have made a strategic error by digging in their heels for so little. A hint for future reference: When your opponent resorts to taunting and mockery, you're winning. Oh yeah? Says who?

Chuck Schumer, for one. For the benefit of Republicans napping, the New York senator informed reporters of his party's panicked strategy when, not realizing that said reporters had already dialed in to a conference call, he revealed his instructions from the Democratic caucus to always use the word "extreme" when describing Boehner and Republicans as boxed in by the Tea Party.

Did someone say adults?

Gamesmanship can be entertaining when the stakes are small. But as the president correctly noted, the economy is not child's play. As painful as the truth is, we can't continue to live beyond our means. Every category of spending will have to take a hit, and we'll have to figure out how to make the sucker float with a minimum of suffering. In the meantime, we might relax our reflexes just a tad and give hysteria a rest.

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