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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 5, 2006 / 7 Nissan, 5766

English spoken here

By Kathleen Parker

Kathleen Parker
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Para espanol, oprima el dos.


Even if one does not speak Spanish, most Americans are familiar with those words. They hear them nearly any time they make a call to the phone, utility or other company that offers service in two languages. "For Spanish, press two."


Even though I speak and love Spanish, I find myself increasingly annoyed by this unsubtle notice that the U.S. is gradually becoming a bilingual nation. And therein lies the source of much aggravation American citizens feel as Congress weighs in on illegal immigration.


Welcome to the U.S. one and all — within reason and according to the law — but all must become one if we are to remain a strong republic. That's the single most compelling truth we seem to know instinctively even if no one is willing to say it.


Whatever one's views in the abstract regarding a guest worker or modified amnesty program, the concrete reality is that many of those seeking to stay in the U.S. are not seeking also to become Americans of the U.S. variety. Indeed, the clear message from some of those protesting the past week or so — and the content of many e-mails that found their way to my mailbox — is that Mexican immigrants are taking back what they consider to be theirs.


At least a segment of those protesting consider themselves to be neither immigrant nor illegal. Signs at one recent rally, for example, read "This is our country, not yours!" and "All Europeans are illegal." "Reconquista" is the word they choose to define their mission, meaning "reconquest."


An e-mailer suggested that I get myself ready for the boat back home because I — being of European descent — don't belong in the U.S. Only American Indians have a rightful claim to the lands my family has occupied since the 1600s, according to the writer's historical yardstick. And only Mexicans have a right to border states that formerly belonged to Mexico.


Well. Where to begin? More to the point, where to end?


If we're all going back to the nations of our origins, we're going to need a mighty big fleet and some sophisticated splicing equipment. I don't know about my correspondents, but I'm a little bit this and a little bit that, though most of my family names would place me in Ireland. I'm of course happy to reclaim the kingdom, but I'm not sure the present landowners in Connemara would welcome me back as the queen I'm certain I deserve to be.


The truth is, I doubt that most illegal immigrants now in the U.S. are interested in reclaiming conquered lands. Most just want a good job and a decent place to raise a family. But the sight of so many who feel entitled to a piece of the U.S., combined with a sense of encroaching bilingualism, contribute to a spirit of diminishing empathies among even the likeliest of sympathizers.


The idea of "reconquest," meanwhile, is silly. Human populations have been migrating, conquering, surrendering and ceding for 60,000 years or so. We're a rambling sort by nature, apparently, and find national borders annoying obstacles to the wanderlust with which we were, for good or bad, endowed.


Rearranging borders and rewriting history to satisfy grudges or to right wrongs would certainly keep us busy, but where would we draw the last line? In the ashes of human history, most likely. The only unequivocal ending to unhappy history, unfortunately, has no sequel. Only when everyone is dead is no one offended.


Barring the final solution, we might ask this: Do illegal Mexican immigrants really want Texas or Arizona or California without the U.S. economy, or the U.S. social services, or the inspired government instruments that have made this country so attractive to so many?


That's the pinch, isn't it? The country's riches and benefits are not free for the picking — nor are they all necessarily indigenous to the physical territory — but are part of a national package that demands citizenship of its citizenry.


Mexicans are as welcome as any other group of people — and we all came from somewhere else, including the American Indians whose ancestors migrated from elsewhere — but reconquering, alas, requires a military action that could get messy. A simpler, more civilized course involves taking a number, waiting in line, and signing on to the principles of assimilation, without which we will not long be a united states of anything or a worthy destination for immigrants.


Para espanol, meanwhile, Mexico is lovely this time of year.

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