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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 24, 2008 / 25 Tishrei 5769

‘W’ Fashion Magazine can Expect Record Sales — from Men

By Julia Gorin


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The issue of "W" Magazine that hit newsstands this week sports a much-buzzed cover shot of Angelina Jolie breastfeeding one of her twin infants, with possibly more in the inside photo spread. Listening to the radio — and reading online comments — one gathers that many people are ambivalent as to how they feel about the appropriateness of such a thing. The layout — where Jolie's assets are fully visible — brings up the ever-present question about whether public breastfeeding should be allowed and, more fundamentally: Are breasts firstly maternal, or sexual?

The fact that it's Angelina Jolie's breasts on display should answer the question once and for all. The woman is a sex symbol, and the choice of featuring a sex symbol to convey the notion of breastfeeding as a "beautiful, natural thing between mother and child" is disingenuous. There's no way that anyone — particularly men — will easily look at the images and innocently think, "What a beautiful, natural thing."

Nor is it likely that such was the motivation behind the editors', and Jolie's, choice to do the spread — regardless of what they may insist to the contrary. "W" is about to sell more magazines than it ever has before. And to a lot more men than it ever has before.

The 2000 Jim Carey movie "Me, Myself and Irene" actually made quick work of the motherly-versus-sexy issue, when the goody-two-shoes side of Carey's split-personality reprimanded a group of men leering and talking dirty about an attractive, well-endowed mother feeding her baby on a park bench within their view. The guys laughed him off with a "Yeah, right — she's a mommy!" Soon after, when the naughty side of Carey's personality took over, the busty mother looked down to find Carey where her baby had been.

The on-again, off-again public breastfeeding controversy that the Jolie cover revives surfaced in the previous election year as well, when a Starbucks employee in Maryland asked a woman to cover up with a blanket while nursing her 15-month-old toddler, or to do it in the bathroom. The woman complained to the regional vice president and got her to recognize a Maryland law that permits public breastfeeding. Then the mother, named Lorig Charkoudian, went further, organizing a breastfeeding "nurse-in" at the store, in which two dozen mothers participated. The goal was to get Starbucks to allow breastfeeding at all of its stores across the country.

So in case you thought it was bad enough that the mommy set monopolizes tight coffee bar spaces with their strollers and double strollers, now they want customers to be either nauseated or aroused, depending on Mommy's looks.

My husband and I were confronted with this scenario when a young hippie couple from Berkeley (pardon the redundancy) struck up a conversation with us at a Las Vegas buffet, where they were strolling around in between helpings with their three children. Two minutes into the conversation, the woman plops down on the floor by our table and flops out a breast to feed her youngest — and continues chatting. I could tell my husband was uneasy. On the one hand, he hasn't seen a breast in person since he got married. On the other hand, it was a hippie breast. He stopped eating and we looked for an escape. But there was none to be had just yet, and so the conversation continued. We found out the granola family was in town for the adult film convention, and the couple was looking to break into the porn industry.

Once the "W" sales figures are tabulated, the Jolie spread should prompt us to come up with a compromise solution to the public breastfeeding controversy. Such as: If women should be allowed to openly nurse their babies, then they shouldn't mind if men and lesbians openly leer at them while nursing their coffees or beers nearby.

Like Ms. Charkoudian's "nurse-in," Jolie and "W" are providing a public service, as there are plenty of men who no doubt would love to save money on their topless-bar and cable bills.

To answer the question, then, whether breasts are more maternal or sexual, the breastfeeding Jolie reminds us that this society repeatedly decides in favor of the latter. (After all, those breasts have been serving Mom a lot longer than they've been serving baby; they're what got her to baby in the first place.) Which means that women who want to breastfeed in front of everyone and pretend it's not an uncomfortable situation should move to an Amazon village. Or to some other third-world place like Europe, where breasts have been sufficiently desexualized. Because we're not there yet.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Julia Gorin is a widely published op-ed writer and comedian who blogs at www.JuliaGorin.com She's the author of the just-published "Clintonisms: The Amusing, Confusing, and Even Suspect Musing, of Billary". Comment by clicking here.

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