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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 29, 2007 / 17 Mar-Cheshvan 5768

World War III? Maybe Bush is on to something

By Jonathan Gurwitz


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When George W. Bush suggested Iran's acquisition of nuclear arms technology might be a catalyst for World War III, progressive-minded people took it as a sign that Chimpy W. McHitlerburton is off his neocon rocker. The president must be spoiling for a new way for Americans to get their heads blown off for his amusement — as Rep. Pete Stark might put it.


Here's the offending quote that put the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Michael Moore at Def Con 2: "If you're interested in avoiding World War III, it seems like you ought to be interested in preventing them from having the knowledge necessary to make a nuclear weapon."


Was that really such a jingoistic message? And what exactly did the president mean about World War III?


Concerning the former, French President Nicolas Sarkozy made much the same point at the United Nations last month.


"If we allow Iran to acquire nuclear weapons, we would incur an unacceptable risk to stability in the region and in the world," he told the General Assembly. "Weakness and renunciation do not lead to peace. They lead to war."


Maybe Sarkozy is a cowboy at heart. Or maybe he and Bush are on to something.


Let's review a few facts. Iran is the world's foremost state sponsor of terrorism through groups such as Hezbollah. Its leaders are guided by an extremist religious ideology that exalts martyrdom.


Iran hid its nuclear research program from the international community for two decades, in violation of its Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty obligations. The existence of the program only became known when an opposition group exposed it in 2002. Since then, Iran has lied repeatedly about the nature and purposes of the program.


Reasonable people — people interested in avoiding war and preserving peace — can conclude, therefore, that a regime that is this dangerous, opaque and dishonest should not be trusted with mankind's most lethal technology. And there are two ways to prevent them from acquiring it.


The first way is peacefully, by laying out economic disincentives for bad behavior and economic inducements for good behavior.


Never mind international sanctions from the U.N. Security Council, where Russia and China do the mullahs' bidding. Even among NATO allies, Germany and Italy seem determined to prove Lenin's maxim about capitalists selling the rope by which their enemies will hang them.


If sanctions aren't effective — or aren't even meaningfully attempted — then the military option is the unappealing alternative of last resort. The message from Bush and Sarkozy was not directed at the leaders of Iran. It was directed at the leaders of the countries who are in a position to make sanctions work but whose irresponsible actions are making the military option inevitable.


And what about World War III? Note that Bush did not say, "If you're interested in avoiding a U.S. attack, you ought to stop Iran." Tehran's nuclear ambitions have spurred a new Middle East arms race and frightened Arab neighbors into pursuing their own "peaceful" nuclear programs.


Every day that Iranian centrifuges process enriched uranium, the edifice of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty crumbles a bit more. If Iran acquires the technological capacity to build a weapon, it will collapse completely.


Then there is Israel, with its own nuclear deterrent, which last month conducted a military strike to pre-empt nuclear weapons research in Syria. In 2002, former Iranian President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani — a so-called moderate — delivered a revealing sermon in which he said the solution to the Zionist problem is the nuclear bomb, one of which could obliterate Israel, while any Israeli response would inflict limited damage on the Islamic world.


"The confrontation of pious and martyrdom-seeking forces with the highest forces of colonialism is extremely dangerous and might inflame a third world war," he said.


Bush and Sarkozy see World War III as a catastrophe to be avoided. Iran's leaders see it as an acceptable consequence of a theological imperative.

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JWR contributor Jonathan Gurwitz, a columnist for the San Antonio Express-News, is a co-founder and twice served as Director General of the Future Leaders of the Alliance program at NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. In 1986 he was placed on the Foreign Service Register of the U.S. State Department.

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© 2007, Jonathan Gurwitz

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