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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Puffed with pride: A puffy pancake provides an impressive centerpiece to any breakfast, yet couldn't be easier to make

By Kim Ode



JewishWorldReview.com | People talk about having drama in their lives like it's a bad thing.

Granted, no one likes drama involving teenagers, bank balances or cellphones dropped in lakes.

But when drama emerges from eggs, flour, milk and sugar, that can be a very good thing.

The trick is having everything — and everyone — ready at the moment the pancake is done. The entertainment value of this German treat is being able to witness its poufy drama before it quickly, inevitably, begins to deflate. Cut and served with the season's best apples, sautéed in butter and sugar until they begin to caramelize, a German pancake can bring down the house.

Heat is the key to your pancake achieving the greatest inflation. A preheated pan does double duty, melting the necessary butter, then crisping the bottom surface of the batter to keep it from sticking to the pan.

The resulting pancake has the bite of a crepe, the loft of a souffle, the egginess of custard and the brown shoulders of a popover. Some like to serve it with preserves or fresh fruit. A squeeze of lemon juice and a dusting of powdered sugar is traditional. Crumbled bacon and maple syrup could be ready for their close-up.

Because a German pancake bakes in only 15 minutes, you can serve one while a second one bakes, which is nice if you're serving a number of people.

If there are kids in the kitchen, turn on the oven light so they can watch the batter rise and inflate into eggy escarpments. If there only are adults, turn the light on anyway.

Because we all like a little drama in our lives.



GERMAN PUFFED PANCAKE

SERVES 4


Note: The recipe is for a 10-inch ovenproof skillet or round cake pan, but can easily be doubled and baked in a 9- by-13-inch pan (metal or Pyrex.) This recipe, often also called Dutch Baby, is adapted from "The Joy of Cooking," although we halved the amount of butter. (Don't worry; there's still plenty.)

  • 2 tbsp. butter

  • 2 eggs, beaten

  • 1/2 c. milk

  • 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract

  • 1/2 c. flour

  • 1/4 c. sugar

  • Pinch of salt




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Sauteed apples, see recipe below

Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees with rack in the middle position. When the oven is at the proper temperature, put the butter in the baking pan and place in oven to melt the butter and preheat the pan.

In the meantime, whisk together the eggs, milk and vanilla extract in a small bowl.

In a larger bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar and salt. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and whisk together until batter is smooth and only a few lumps remain. It's OK to have a few; you don't want to overbeat the batter or the pancake could become tough. You also can combine all the ingredients in a blender, processing until just smooth.

Once the butter is melted and begins to sizzle, carefully pour the batter into the hot pan. The butter will disperse to the edges. Do not stir.

Bake for 15 minutes, until puffed and golden.

Bring the puffed pancake out for people to see, then slice and serve with sautéed apples and a sprinkling of cinnamon.

Nutrition information per serving (without apples):

Calories: 210 Fat: 9 g Sodium: 130 mg

Carbohydrates: 26 g Saturated fat: 5 g Calcium: 55 mg

Protein: 6 g Cholesterol: 110 mg Dietary fiber: 0 g

Diabetic exchanges per serving: 1 bread/starch, 1/2 other carb, 1/2 medium-fat meat, 11/2 fat.

SAUTEED APPLES

SERVES 4

  • 2 large baking apples such as Cortland or Haralson

  • 3 tbsp. butter

  • 3 tbsp. sugar

  • Cinnamon for garnish


Directions: Peel and core the apples, then slice each into about 12 slices, thick enough that they'll hold their shape and not melt into applesauce.

Melt butter over medium heat in a shallow saucepan, then add apples and sugar, stirring gently to coat. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until apples soften and begin to color a bit. Set aside on lowest heat to keep them warm until the pancake is done.

Nutrition information per serving:

Calories: 165 Fat: 9 g Sodium: 76 mg

Carbohydrates: 23 g Saturated fat: 5 g Calcium: 9 mg

Protein: 0 g Cholesterol: 23 mg Dietary fiber: 1 g

Diabetic exchanges per serving: 1 fruit, 1/2 other carb, 2 fat.


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