Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

It ain't sophisticated, but this FROZEN CHOCOLATE OREO ICE CREAM CAKE is a showstopper

By Faith Durand



JewishWorldReview.com | Ice cream cakes are an adored element of summer parties, a magnificent American creation of cake, ice cream and icing. Does it get any more glorious? I don't think so!

However, making an ice cream cake at home is quite a labor of love. It's time-consuming and a little tricky, since you need to bake a cake and cool it, then stack it carefully with ice cream rounds that have been frozen in the same shape as the cake.

I take a much more slapdash approach to the cake-and-ice-cream combo here, with a store-bought chocolate cake (although, of course, you can use a homemade cake!) that has been chopped up and mixed with ice cream. It is more like a trifle than a layer cake, chunks of cake mixed with custard-like ice cream. If you prefer more distinct layers of ice cream and cake, of course, this won't quite do it, but I find this approach much easier and simpler.


WE FEED YOUR SOUL, INTELLECT --- AND STOMACH

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". HUNDREDS of columnists and cartoonists regularly appear. Sign up for the daily update. It's free. Just click here.

I get the ice cream really soft and layer it with chopped cake held together with more ice cream, and pack it all into a springform pan to hold it together. After it freezes solid, it's easy to unmold this cake -- almost as easy as making it, which takes all of 10 minutes.

Yes, it's a sugar bomb -- a magnificent stack of Oreos, ice cream and cake -- a showstopper all-American dessert. No, it's not restrained or sophisticated, but sometimes a big bite of ice cream and cake is just the thing.

FROZEN CHOCOLATE OREO ICE CREAM CAKE

Serves: At least 8

  • 1 (13-ounce) package Oreos or chocolate sandwich cookies, plus additional to garnish if desired
  • 16 ounces chocolate cake, such as a store-bought chocolate pound or bundt cake.
  • 2 quarts vanilla ice cream, very soft
  • 1 cup chocolate sauce, such as Oreo Hot Fudge Sauce, warmed
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate
  • 1 tablespoon butter

Prepare a 10-inch springform pan by greasing extremely lightly with butter or baking spray. Roughly chop or crumble the sandwich cookies into quarters or smaller bite-sized bits, and divide into three parts. Crumble the cake into a large bowl, and stir in about 1/3 of the crumbled sandwich cookies.

Dump in about 2/3 of a quart of very soft vanilla ice cream, and stir gently but thoroughly until the cake and ice cream are well combined. Press this mixture into the bottom of the springform pan.

In a separate bowl, mix the remaining 1 1/3 quarts vanilla ice cream with another 1/3 of the crumbled cookies. Swirl in about 1/2 cup of the chocolate sauce. Press this on top of the cake mixture in the springform pan; it will come nearly up to the top of the pan.

Press the remaining cookies into the top of the cake and drizzle the remaining sauce over top, swirling it and pressing it in so it doesn't run over the side of the pan.

Lightly cover the cake pan and freeze for at least 4 hours, ideally overnight.

When ready to serve, let the cake sit at room temperature for about 5 minutes, and run a knife around the inside of the cake pan. Open the springform mold gently; it should release easily from the slightly melted cake. Re-freeze the unmolded cake while you prepare the chocolate.

Gently melt the chocolate with the butter over low heat in a small saucepan. When completely melted, drizzle over the ice cream cake and serve in big wedges with additional cookies to garnish, if you need one last dose of crunchy cookie!

(Faith Durand is managing editor of TheKitchn.com, a nationally known blog for people who love food and home cooking. Submit any comments or questions to kitchn@apartmenttherapy.com.)

Interested in a private Judaic studies instructor — for free? Let us know by clicking here.

Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

To comment, please click here.

© 2012, APARTMENT THERAPY. Distributed by Tribune Media Services Inc.