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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 28, 2006 / 7 Kislev, 5767

Some things never change

By Cal Thomas


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The French journalist and novelist Alphonse Karr is credited with saying, "The more things change, the more they remain the same." Though Karr lived in the 19th century, his insight could well apply to the United States Congress in the 20th and 21st centuries, especially when it comes to spending, the last truly bipartisan and unchanging indulgence of both parties.


Following the election that will put them in the majority come January, Democratic leaders announced that they had taken the pledge. Things would be different, they said. Democrats would be far more ethical than Republicans. In his response to President Bush's radio address last Saturday, soon-to-be House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland said, "…we will — and we must — change the way things are done in Washington." If that sort of talk sounds familiar, it should. It is what Republicans said prior to, and after, the 1994 election.


It all sounds so noble, even righteous, but the results are the same: Members of Congress don't change Washington; Washington changes them.


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Even before the Democrats become the majority party in Congress, there are signs that little of importance will change. New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick recently wrote a front-page story in which he quotes Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-HI) on "earmark reform." Inouye said, "I don't see any monumental changes." Inouye will take the gavel from the current chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee, Sen. Ted Stevens (R-AK). The two have what Kirkpatrick calls an "unusual bipartisan camaraderie while divvying up projects."


They are not alone. Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) indicates she, too, will jump on the gravy train because "what is good for the goose is good for the gander." Nice. So much for Democrats' commitment to reform. Apparently, the only "reform" will be to use their majority status to funnel more of our tax dollars to the pet projects of Democrats.


Democratic leaders have promised to require that earmarks bear the name of the member who proposes them. Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who has been tireless in his, so far, futile attempts to reform the earmark system, told the Times, "Transparency would be enough if we had any shame, if you were embarrassed to get an earmark for the National Wild Turkey Federation." He was referring to a $234,000 earmark in a recent agricultural spending bill. But, said Flake, "Republicans and Democrats have shown that is no longer any embarrassment."


Tom Schatz, president of the watchdog group, Citizens Against Government Waste, has noted, "There are three parties in Washington: Democrats, Republicans and appropriators." The surest sign of eternal life in Washington is a government program. Recall "the bridge to nowhere." Congress last year earmarked $230 million to build a bridge that would connect Gravina Island, Alaska (population 50) to the town of Ketchikan. After a public outcry and a temper tantrum by Sen. Ted Stevens, Congress removed the earmark instructions and allowed Alaska authorities to spend the money as they wish.


A lousy idea, however, does not mean loss of an appropriation. Outgoing Alaska Governor Frank Murkowski (R) is still trying to keep the project alive. According to the Associated Press, "the lame duck governor hopes to award a $30 million contract for roadwork leading to the proposed bridge by Dec. 1, three days before he leaves office." Incoming Republican Governor-elect Sarah Paulin (R) "supports construction of the bridge but has neither commented on the current governor's actions nor explained how she plans to cover the cost."


It's difficult to take either party seriously when it repeatedly promises reform, but does little or nothing. In an interview with the Honolulu Advertiser the day following the election, Sen. Inouye said he had "a chat with Senator Stevens before the election. We pledged to each other that no matter what happens, we will continue with our tested system of bipartisanship, and we've been doing this for the past 25 years, and it's worked."


It's worked for them, perhaps, but it hasn't worked for those who pay for the pork. Nothing changes and nothing will change unless there are more and frequent outcries by outraged taxpayers.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is the author of, among others, The Wit and Wisdom of Cal Thomas Comment by clicking here.


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