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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct 27, 2011 / 29 Tishrei, 5772

Bobby Jindal's Triumph

By Cal Thomas




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Republican Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana last weekend won re-election with a staggering 65.8 percent of the vote in a state that remains heavily Democratic. It is, the governor's office contends, the highest percentage achieved by a candidate since the state's open primary was created. Jindal won all of the state's 64 parishes, increasing by four the number of parishes he won in 2007.

One might expect this to be big news beyond the state, but most newspapers and TV media outside Louisiana either buried Jindal's win on inside pages and deep into their newscasts, or ignored it.

In a telephone conversation, I asked Governor Jindal why? "It runs contrary to the political thinking in Washington, which is about more spending and bigger government," he said. The big media don't want to focus on successes that come as the result of smaller government and less spending because it not only reduces the size and power of government, but the influence of journalists who see themselves co-equal with, if not superior to, government.

Republicans don't do well, Jindal says, "when we are not consistent with our principles." The coming election, he adds, needs to offer a clear choice between "a permanent central government in Washington and a conservative approach" that will achieve what everyone says must be done -- Social Security and Medicare reform, a transformed tax code and smaller government. He calls November 2012 a "tipping point election."

Jindal says Texas governor and GOP presidential candidate Rick Perry, whom he has endorsed, can best advance the conservative ideas they share because of Perry's executive experience, energy policies, job creation and commitment to reducing the size and cost of government.

Would Jindal take vice president if the eventual nominee offered him the job? He gives the standard answer, "I already have a job," but given what he sees as a "once in a lifetime" opportunity to affect real change, it's hard to believe he would reject the offer should he get the call.



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It would be nearly impossible for President Obama to criticize Jindal's record in Louisiana, including his success in turning around failing schools following the destruction of Hurricane Katrina. That disaster has led not only to new school buildings but also reconstructed curricula, school choice and improved grades.

While President Obama makes speeches and wants to spend money we don't have in a phony attempt to create jobs, Jindal is succeeding with conservative ideas.

In his re-election campaign, Jindal pledged to overhaul his state's tax structure in order to improve the business climate that was stifling job creation. His office maintains that "he quickly cut taxes that were directly penalizing business investments, which create more Louisiana jobs. He also fulfilled his 2007 campaign commitment to enact targeted tax credits that would lead to job creation in high-growth industries. Over the past three and a half years Louisiana has seen a job creation turnaround, with the state announcing projects that create more than 45,000 new direct and indirect jobs and more than $10 billion in capital investment. CATO's Fiscal Policy Report Card, which weighs revenues and tax changes, gave Louisiana an 'A' in their 2010 ranking because of new tax changes."

Jindal also confronted wasteful spending, which Washington politicians often talk about, but do little to reverse. He reduced the state budget by $9 billion, or 26 percent, in part by eliminating unnecessary government jobs and streamlining services.

For the third year in a row, Southern Business and Development named Louisiana "State of the Year" for attracting business investment and creating jobs. People are migrating to Louisiana after several years of emigration. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, "this is the fourth consecutive year of Louisiana population in-migration."

Bobby Jindal's electoral and economic successes should serve not only as a model, but also as an inspiration to Republican candidates for president and Congress. The miracle of Louisiana can also work in other states and in Washington because Jindal is the latest conservative to demonstrate that conservative principles work and that those principles should not be shied away from, but embraced.

His resume and track record commend him for vice president, whoever the eventual Republican nominee turns out to be.


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Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

© 2011, Tribune Media Services, Inc.

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