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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 12, 2011 / 12 Menachem-Av, 5771

The Death of a Principled Moderate

By Cal Thomas




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Mark Hatfield, 89, who died last weekend in his native Oregon, was the first Christian politician I recall meeting in Washington, which is to say he did more than keep a Bible on his desk. He sought to keep its words and teachings and its main "Character" in his heart.

When we first met in the early '70s I was in the middle of my own "faith journey," trying to sort out what Scripture teaches about this world and the next and to see if it could match my conservative political leanings. Hatfield suggested to me that the two kingdoms -- of G0d and of the world -- sometimes intersect, but more often diverge. He was criticized by some political conservatives for aligning himself with liberal Democratic Senator George McGovern against the war in Vietnam. The McGovern-Hatfield amendment, had it passed, would have set a deadline for the end of U.S. military operations in South Vietnam. McGovern-Hatfield became "the most outstanding defiance of executive power regarding the war prior to 1971," writes Wikipedia. That defiance is repeated today in debates over wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya and the use of U.S. military might around the world.

Hatfield and McGovern were right about Vietnam. The reason more of us didn't recognize it at the time was that proponents of the war (most of whom didn't have to fight it) wrapped themselves in the flag and treated any criticism of Presidents Johnson and Nixon and their prosecution of the war as unpatriotic. Sound familiar?

In 1981, after his elevation to chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I met with him in his upgraded office. This when what was known as the "Religious Right" was flexing its muscles in the aftermath of Ronald Reagan's victory and the defeat of five liberal Democratic senators, including McGovern.

Hatfield told me he had been through the religious wars before. He mentioned the Scofield Reference Bible, which to many self-identified fundamentalist Christians was the only "true" and reliable translation. Some regarded any other translation as "heretical." Hatfield thought it more important to apply the teachings of Jesus, rather than argue about "jots and tittles."



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Hatfield wasn't perfect. He was the target of two ethics investigations. One involved his wife, Antoinette. In 1984, Mrs. Hatfield, a realtor, received $55,000 in fees from Basil Tsakos, a Greek financier, "while Hatfield was promoting Tsakos' trans-Africa pipeline proposal," Salon.com reports. "Hatfield denied wrongdoing." The Hatfields apologized and donated the money to charity. And in 1992, Hatfield, writes the Washington Post, "was formally rebuked by the Senate ethics committee for not disclosing more than $42,000 in gifts from friends and lobbyists." He apologized again and was later cleared of the charges. Mostly, though, Hatfield lived up to the "St. Mark" label applied to him by his admirers.

Hatfield was thought of as a consistent "pro-lifer." He opposed abortion (though he never worked to limit it), the death penalty and war. In 1982, he told the Christian Science Monitor, "There is to me a direct ratio between the increase of our arsenals and the diminishing sense of national security. There comes a time in a nation's life when additional money spent for rockets and bombs, far from strengthening national security, will actually weaken national security -- when there are people who are hungry and not fed, people who are cold and not clothed." That last line is straight from the teachings of Jesus.

Some of his fellow Christians may not have always agreed with Mark Hatfield, but they couldn't accuse him of hypocrisy. He consistently lived by the standards he professed and challenged others to do the same. Though we may have disagreed on some political issues, our common faith kept us close. In the end that is all that really mattered -- to Mark Hatfield and to me.


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Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

© 2011, Tribune Media Services, Inc.

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