Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Aug 7, 2012/ 19 Menachem-Av, 5772

The 'boring' 2012 campaign

By Cal Thomas




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | PLYMOUTH NOTCH, Vt. -- Two of my pundit colleagues -- David Brooks of The New York Times and Peggy Noonan of The Wall Street Journal -- have written about this "boring" and "inconsequential" presidential campaign.

Perhaps the reason is that we've heard it all before. "There is nothing new under the sun," wrote the author of Ecclesiastes, but that doesn't mean old ideas that worked in the past can't be updated and applied to our time.

Here in the birthplace of our 30th president, Calvin Coolidge, an education center stands to promote his ideas and values (full disclosure: I serve on its National Advisory Board). Even Democratic politicians, including Governor Howard Dean, Senator Patrick Leahy and Independent Democratic Socialist Bernie Sanders, have made the journey to this frozen-in-time hamlet to honor Coolidge, if not always his principles. Some of Coolidge's contemporaries may have found his reserved New England manner boring, but some moderns are starting to reconsider the economic rules and political standards by which he lived.

Another reason this presidential campaign has failed to ignite the public's enthusiasm is that it seems more about politicians and their power and not enough about everyday realities; too many talking points and not enough getting to the point.

Following President Obama's "you didn't build that" remark, the Romney campaign produced TV commercials featuring small business owners sharing how they built their companies, often from scratch. The stories are interesting and compelling and it's a tactic the campaign should use more often. Debating policies is academic. Showing real people who have been harmed by policies that aren't working is how to connect with voters.



RECEIVE LIBERTY LOVING COLUMNISTS IN YOUR INBOX … FOR FREE!

Every weekday NewsAndOpinion.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". HUNDREDS of columnists and cartoonists regularly appear. Sign up for the daily update. It's free. Just click here.


"All liberty is individual liberty," noted Coolidge. That sounds strangely foreign in an age where the collective is becoming supreme. "It takes a village" has come to mean a government village, not a village of individuals helping each other with government intervening only when individuals are not enough.

Vermonters remain proud that after last summer's floods they astounded FEMA by helping each other with greater speed and better results than government could produce. They call it the communitarian spirit. Neighbor is expected to help neighbor.

The Romney campaign should consider speeches and more campaign ads that feature people who have "made it" on their own, or who have overcome personal difficulties by embracing timeless truths. It should stop debating Democrats about tax "fairness" and start focusing on how much of our money government wastes. Republicans can never win a debate about "fairness," even though it is unfair to disproportionately penalize the productive. Everyone understands waste, fraud and abuse. Romney needs an updated version of the "Golden Fleece Award" created by the late Senator William Proxmire (D-WI), who highlighted wasteful government spending.

Two of my favorite Coolidge quotes should be modernized by the Romney campaign and sold to voters. One is: "I favor the policy of economy, not because I wish to save money, but because I wish to save people. The men and women of this country who toil are the ones who bear the cost of the government. Every dollar that we carelessly waste means that their life will be so much the more meager. Every dollar that we prudently save means that their life will be so much the more abundant. Economy is idealism in its most practical form."

The other attributed to Coolidge: "Nothing is easier than spending the public money. It does not appear to belong to anybody. The temptation is overwhelming to bestow it on somebody."

If Romney and his fellow Republicans reminded voters of a time when government respected small business, individuals and their earnings, this campaign would get interesting and consequential real fast.


Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.



BUY THE BOOK
Click HERE to purchase it at a discount. (Sales help fund JWR.).

Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

© 2011, Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles