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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 21, 2011 / 18 Nissan, 5771

No Trump

By Cal Thomas




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | In bridge, a trump card is held in reserve for winning a trick. In politics, Donald Trump is anything but reserved and appears to think he might trick enough voters to win the next presidential election.

There's plenty to draw on when critiquing a possible Trump candidacy. His multiple marriages (three) and affairs provide fodder for the media and contrast poorly with President Obama's "family values" image as husband of one wife and father of young daughters, whom he clearly loves.

In recent weeks, Trump has been trying to gain a toehold in the evangelical community, which is especially influential in Iowa, where caucuses begin the process of nominating a presidential candidate.

In an interview with David Brody of the Christian Broadcasting Network, Trump described Christianity as "a wonderful religion." In answer to a question about his faith, Trump said, "I believe in God. I am Christian. I think the Bible is certainly, it is 'the' book. It is the thing."

To evangelical ears, that lacks substance. While a candidate's faith should matter only if it affects policy, if someone wishes to use his or her faith to win votes, then voters ought to be able to judge the depth of that faith as a means of determining their credibility.

What should we make of Trump telling Brody that people send him Bibles all the time and that he stores them "in a very nice place"? "There is no way I would ever throw anything, to do anything negative to a Bible. I would have a fear of doing something other than very positive so actually I store them and keep them and sometimes give them away to other people."



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Does he read the Bible and believe what it says? How about the parts concerning marriage, divorce and fornication? Would that be something Trump should take to heart? Brody didn't ask and Trump didn't volunteer. He did say he goes to church "as much as I can. Always on Christmas. Always on Easter. Always when there's a major occasion." Christians know a lot of people who attend church only on Christmas and Easter and special occasions. They are usually not serious about their faith. Not to judge, but if Trump intends to use faith to win votes from people of faith, then those people have a right to determine whether he is sincere or simply trying to manipulate them.

Trump also appears shifty when it comes to judging our "worst" president. In 2007, Trump said President George W. Bush was "the worst president ever." In 2008, he said Bush should be impeached and that he was "impressed" by then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. But this year he says President Obama is "the worst president ever." He is also on record as saying Jimmy Carter was the worst president.

Trump has donated to many liberal Democrats, arguing that since he lives in liberal New York City he had no other choice. Really?

Conservative talk show host Mark Levin isn't buying it. On a recent broadcast of "The Mark Levin Show," he asked, "Where was (Trump) during the tea party's rise and throughout the battles it was having? Why was he donating to Senator (Chuck) Schumer, Congressman Anthony Weiner and Hillary Clinton's campaigns when the tea party was beginning to rise?" Levin also notes that Trump wants universal health care and asked, "How is that conservative?" Trump also has flipped from pro-choice on abortion to pro-life because, he told ABC's George Stephanopoulos, two married friends who wanted to abort their child, decided not to and now are happy they didn't. Pro-lifers won't be impressed because Trump didn't mention the baby's right to life.

Donald Trump is no conservative. In fact, it's hard to say which party he's affiliated with. In 1987, he was Republican. In 1999, he switched to the Independence Party. In 2009, when he first considered the presidency, the New York Daily News reported, "The Donald switched his party affiliation from Democrat to Republican."

One thing's for sure, if he runs for president, he could harm the eventual Republican nominee. Maybe that's why so many in the liberal media are promoting him while President Obama's approval ratings continue to fall.


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Cal Thomas Archives

JWR contributor Cal Thomas is co-author with Bob Beckel, a liberal Democratic Party strategist, of "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America". Comment by clicking here.

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