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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 11, 2008 / 13 Mar-Cheshvan 5769

Fairer to One than the other

By Wesley Pruden


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | With the messiah safe at last, some of the notabilities of press and tube are climbing out of Barack Obama's media tank with tales of what's been going on in there.


It's an article of media faith that everybody with a press card is incapable of showing bias - with the exception of a few newspapers like this one, the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post and, of course, Fox News. Anyone who says otherwise is a vacuous irrelevancy. So when someone strays off the reservation it's front-page news, even when it's not on the front page.


Deborah Howell, the ombudsman (a Swedish word her newsroom now defines as "newsroom harpie") at The Washington Post finally had enough on Sunday and took her newspaper's best and brightest severely to task for allowing its reporters and editors to climb into that tank. "Readers have been consistently critical of the lack of probing issues coverage and what they saw as a tilt toward Democrat Barack Obama," she wrote. "My surveys, which ended on Election Day, show that [readers] are right on both counts."


Even before Election Day, Harold Evans, once editor of the Times of London and the London Sunday Times, was even blunter, perhaps because as the former editor he no longer has to risk life and limb walking among his former colleagues: "It's fitting that the cynicism 'vote early and vote often' is commonly attributed to Chicago's Democratic boss, Mayor Richard Daley, who famously voted the graveyards in 1960 to help put John F. Kennedy in the White House. In this 2008 race, it's the American media that have voted very early and often. They long ago elected the star graduate of Chicago's Democratic machine, Barack Obama."


In fact, Reuters, the British news service that most slavishly follows the line of least resistance to bias, isn't even waiting for the inauguration. Most of the media refers to the new president as "President-elect Obama." To Reuters, he's occasionally already "President Obama."


Miss Howell relies on statistical analysis to demonstrate her point, that by sheer weight of words and mush her newspaper showed bias. The Post's news pages reflected a lopsided attention to Mr. Obama's interests, "with 1,295 horse-race stories and 594 issues stores. The Post was deficient in stories that reported more than the two candidates trading jabs; readers needed articles, going back to the primaries, comparing their positions with outside experts' views. There were no broad stories on energy or science policy, and there were few on religion issues."


All very interesting, up to a point. But these are mere statistics about what everybody who reads newspapers already knows, and the numbers, impressive as they may be, do not tell the story.


"What's troubling to anyone old-fashioned enough to care about standards in journalism," says Mr. Evans, is how the news is presented. The old notions of objectivity, fairness and thoroughness still get occasional lip service, though the Associated Press, once the gold standard of objectivity and neutrality, now boasts of telling it like it only imagines it is. "The coverage," says Mr. Evans, "has been slavishly on the side of 'the one.' "


Not just against Republicans. He cites the way reporters connived in the Obama campaign's insinuations that Hillary and Bill Clinton were race-baiters in South Carolina. The Clintons are a lot of things, but they've never been credibly accused of race-baiting. Bubba took considerable heat early on in Arkansas when he ran against a powerful segregationist tide, before Barack Obama had put on his first pair of long pants.


The most discouraging part of the sad state of media affairs is that there's scant sign it will ever get better. All that writhing around together down in the tank has only reinforced the high opinion the correspondents and commentators have of themselves. They imagine they're responsible for electing a president - and maybe they are - and they can't wait to keep on doing it.


Newspapers, even those "too big to fail," have come on parlous times. The daily newspaper not so long ago was the arbiter of the manners and even the morals of its community, determining community's view of itself, its personality and its character. Now all that is mostly gone, and most of the editors and publishers think the way to survival is to give the readers more of what ails them. Crusty old city editors who relished making the lives of young reporters miserable in pursuit of teaching them how to be thorough and fair - "Son, nobody cares about what you think about anything, just tell me what happened" - are mostly disappearing. That stuff in the tank is poison.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Wesley Pruden is editor in chief of The Washington Times. Comment by clicking here.

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