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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review January 15, 2008 / 8 Shevat 5768

Taking a switch to the candidates

By Wesley Pruden


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Maybe Bill Clinton wasn't our first black president, after all.


Bubba and the missus had to interrupt Hillary's presidential campaign yesterday to deal with an outbreak of foot-in-mouth disease. They might have to call in Trent Lott and Don Imus for tips.


This is not your grandfather's race baiting — that giant whooshing sound is the ghosts of Theodore Bilbo, Pitchfork Ben Tillman and Ross Barnett dancing in the graveyard — but the Clintons, with a little help from Barack Obama, have loosed the race issue on us just when we thought all that had been put to rest.


Andrew Cuomo, the Democratic attorney general of New York, a partisan for Hillary, set off the contretemps when he called Mr. Obama's policies a "shuck and jive." Several Obama folks cried that "shuck and jive" is racial code for deceit and cheating. Indeed it can be, but "shuck" was the rustic's euphemism for something you get on your shoes in the barnyard and "jive" is the euphemism for a lot of things, including the sex act.


But we no longer have to pay attention to the actual meaning of words. Everyone is entitled to take offense when he just thinks what he hears is an insult. Bubba has played the race card before, once at the expense of old friends at home when he said he remembered the shame he felt for the black churches torched when he was a barefoot boy in Arkansas. It turned out that he remembered something no one else, black or white, did. An investigation revealed that no church black or white had ever been torched in Arkansas.


While Hillary was trying yesterday to make amends for saying something taken as a slight to the memory of Martin Luther King, Bubba was going from talk show to talk show trying to defuse black anger over remarks made by a black Hillary partisan suggesting that Mr. Obama had once used drugs. This was particularly ironic since the senator himself wrote in his autobiography that he had once used drugs. (Dissing yourself doesn't count.)


The formerly black president conceded that he had said something about the Obama rhetoric being "a fairy tale," but that was after somebody in the Obama campaign called Hillary an India Indian, "the senator from Punjab." This was after — or maybe it was before — Robert Johnson, the president of Black Entertainment Network, accused Mr. Obama of once "doing something in the neighborhood, and I won't say what he was doing, but he said it in his book."


Race-baiting was simpler in the old days. Everybody understood what was insult or not, whether by the early George Wallace, the late Orval Faubus, or Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. Now a lot of explanation, argument and counterargument, is necessary to plumb whether anyone was actually insulted, dissed or affronted.


We live in the age of insensitivity, called and raised. Bubba thinks Mr. Obama is getting the best of a double standard. "We have been much kinder to him than he has been to her." (Besides his daddy can lick your daddy.) Maybe we should take this campaign out in the schoolyard and take a switch to the candidates. Some feminists are miffed that blacks enjoy a double standard of another kind. Using racist language may be more unforgivable in polite company, says Marie Wilson of the White House project, which encourages women in politics. "With women, you can get away with it. With race, you can hardly say anything."


But what's wrong with that? What we need is for everybody to shut up.

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JWR contributor Wesley Pruden is editor in chief of The Washington Times. Comment by clicking here.

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