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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 27, 2007 / 8 Nissan, 5767

When in doubt, act offended

By Paul Greenberg


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | These days American politics seems to have become a contest to see who can be most offended. In this Age of Political Correctness (to a fault), the political operatives who once specialized in the bean ball adopt the slider. Rather than respond to criticism, they act offended by it.


In a democracy, a contact sport like politics should depend on what might politely be called "a robust exchange of opinion," but the Deeply Offended now insist that it be played like tiddly-winks.


Here's the latest case in point: David Geffen, a Hollywood big and therefore Big Giver, was chatting about the Clintons the other day, saying much the same things a lot of folks have said during the long, exhausting course of Bill and Hillary's rise and fall, and rise again. Here, among other catty things, is what Mr. Geffen told Maureen Dowd, today's Louella Parsons of political columnists:


"I don't think that another incredibly polarizing figure, no matter how smart she is and no matter how ambitious she is — and G-d knows, is there anybody more ambitious than Hillary Clinton? — can bring the country together. I don't believe in the last six years, all of a sudden Bill Clinton has become a different person. Marc Rich getting pardoned? An oil-profiteer expatriate who left the country rather than pay taxes or face justice? Yet another time when the Clintons were unwilling to stand for the things that they genuinely believe in. Everybody in politics lies, but they do it with such ease, it's troubling."


Ooo-wee, that smarts. Mr. Geffen, who's now backing Barack Obama for president, wasn't holding back. His assessment of the Clintons was enough to bring poor Bob Kerrey to mind. Remember him? A one-time senator from Nebraska, he once casually mentioned that "Clinton's an unusually good liar. Unusually good."


And that was as early as 1996 — before Bill Clinton's sworn testimony in the late unpleasantness known as L'Affaire Lewinsky. In the end, contrary to Bob Kerrey, Bill Clinton did not prove all that good a liar. He got caught.


One of Hillary Clinton's great assets in her presidential campaign, perhaps the greatest, is her spouse, who may be the best politician — well, the best vote-getter — in recent American history. Alas, he may also prove her greatest handicap, since he drags the scandal-filled Clinton Years behind him wherever he goes.


Remember how We the People were going to get two for the price of one back in '92? That theme seems to have disappeared from the current Clinton presidential campaign, and for understandable reasons.


Conflating the two Clintons is scarcely fair — it wasn't Miss Hillary who admitted to giving false testimony — but it's bound to happen. The two Clintons are as inseparably linked in the public mind as they are in Mr. Geffen's.


That such talk should come from David Geffen, who once enjoyed Bill Clinton's confidence and hospitality, complete with the Lincoln Bedroom treatment, adds authority to what otherwise would have been cocktail party chit-chat. It must have hurt. So much so that the Clinton campaign played the I Am Deeply Offended card, which has become the standard substitute for rebuttal in American political debate.


The Clinton machine wasted no time demanding that Barack Obama's campaign renounce David Geffen's support and give back any funds the Hollywood mogul had raised for Sen. Obama's presidential campaign. Meanwhile, Senator Clinton herself was clambering up to the high ground ("I want to run a positive campaign") and warning against, yes, the Politics of Personal Destruction.


Tell that to Billy Ray Dale of the White House travel office, who had to defend himself against false accusations when the Clinton administration purged that whole office in its opening days.


But that was long ago, and Hillary Clinton has undergone many a makeover since. Now, while her flacks try to blame Barack Obama for Mr. Geffen's broadside, she adopts the above-the-battle stance of any establishment pol when challenged by some upstart. And her campaign staff has learned that, these politically correct days, the best offense is to sound offended.

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