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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 23, 2008 18 Iyar 5768 5768

Rock the Ignorance

By Suzanne Fields


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The youth vote is rockin' if not rollin'. Young voters who blog — and there are lots of them — boast they're the voting bloc that's hot. "Young voters are the new pink," a Rock the Vote blogger shouts. "Or the new orange? The new indigo?" They're like that little black dress, always poised to save the moment.


The Obama campaign boasts that it registered thousands of new young voters. Hillary had her "Hillblazers," cheered on by daughter Chelsea, and John McCain says he'll contest every youth vote in November. Why else would he stay up late to joke and spar with David Letterman and Jon Stewart? He wants to show that he's not an old dog with new tricks, but a hipster with maverick's reputation and biography of heroism to appeal to the young voters. He's a rebel with causes.


That all sounds good, but we've got to hope these younger voters know enough to understand what the debate is about. The young have been short-changed by the educationists for decades, learning not very much. The millennials, the under 30s, grew up reprising the lyrics of "Don't Know Much About History."


How much they don't know about Middle Eastern politics is especially worrisome. If the textbooks of the millennials were anything like the textbooks the kids are studying today, they're not prepared to understand what President Bush was talking about when he told the Israeli Knesset last week: "Some seem to believe we should negotiate with terrorists and radicals, as if some ingenious argument will persuade them they have been wrong all along."


They might even be incapable of identifying the terrorists, or understanding the radical theology driving them to kill innocents in the name of Allah. The American Textbook Council, an independent research organization, examined the errors and political biases in American history textbooks for public junior high and high schools, and published a report called "Islam in the Classroom." The results are terrifying. It demonstrates how editors and teachers are duped by Islamist organizations that persuaded publishers to weave misinformation — and disinformation — into the textbooks, exploiting ignorance, naivete and bias in the name of diversity and political correctness. Many of these texts spin an uncritical view of radical Islam, spiced with anti-Western criticism.


"In the case of Islamic activism, theological aims are often concealed in familiar, appealing civic language," the council reports. "Few publishers or editors understand history textbooks for what they are: instruments of civic education that have among their responsibilities the obligation to alert the young to threats to American ideals and security." Editors instead depend on highly biased sources for writing about subjects the authors know little or nothing about. Islamist propaganda, often not very sophisticated, is accepted as fact.


The textbooks make no distinctions between societies with law founded on separation of church and state and Muslim governments founded on primitive theology. There's no understanding of the differences between Sharia, or a religious code, and Western law derived from the consent of the governed. Distinctions between democracy and the totalitarian regimes of most Islamic countries go unremarked and unappreciated.


Prentice-Hall's high school world history textbook, "The Modern World," for example, presents the events of 9-11 with such flatness and brevity that the student learns nothing about who the "teams of terrorists" were, why they did what they did, what their political ends were. The rabidly radical Wahabbi sect in Saudi Arabia, which produced 19 of the 9-11 bombers, is merely described as "strict."


In many texts, "jihad" is cleansed of belligerence. Readers couldn't understand why jihadists should not be "appeased," nor understand an informed debate about the Israel-Palestine dispute. They get no understanding of how the only democracy in the Middle East is surrounded by powerful enemies like President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran, who calls Israel a "stinking corpse" that he promises to destroy. They learn nothing about the state-sanctioned abuse of women. Poverty and ignorance are presented as the root of extremism, with no acknowledgment that the 9-11 bombers were wealthy and educated.


Reform of such textbooks requires the strong resolve of school boards, administrators, elected officials and parents to pressure the textbook publishers to tell it like it actually is.


President Bush told a small group of Jewish, Palestinians and Israeli Arab students in Israel that they must be alert to the "poisonous" propaganda from state-owned radio and television stations in the Middle East that obstruct true peacemakers. He's right, of course. And we must be aware of the "sweet euphemisms" about radical Islam in American textbooks if we're serious about the pursuit of authentic peace.

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© 2006, Creators Syndicate, Suzanne Fields

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