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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 19, 2009 / 27 Sivan 5769

Irritations both Small and Large

By Greg Crosby


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | At what point did the entire world discover the word "disrespect"? I hear that word used, especially among young people, more frequently these days than even "cool." "He disrespected me, man." "She disrespected my car." "I hate my parents…they so totally disrespected my privacy." It's as if all of a sudden "disrespect" became the word of choice for an entire generation. So when did that happen exactly? Was it about the same time everybody started pronouncing "didn't" DID-DENT. "I did-dent want to leave, but he made me." "Hey, I did-dent disrespect you!"


Slang comes and goes, some of it is fun, some I hate, but slang expressions are not what bother me. What really grates on me are the misuse and mispronouncing of English. The most extreme case of late being the mispronouncing of the word "picture" as "pitcher." This has gotten so common now that I'm hearing it said that way by announcers on national broadcasts and commercials. There is a Kellogg's ad running now where the voice-over announcer uses the expression "picture perfect" and pronounces it "pitcher perfect." This isn't done for humor or anything, it is serious.


The quote from Sonia Sotomayor, the new Obama appointee for the Supreme Court "…."I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life," is so racist at its core that it frightens me. She gets away with it because of her gender and race and because it's okay to slander white men in this country. You know if a white male judge had said it, the man would not only be disqualified immediately for the Supreme Court, his career would be ruined. I really can't stand the double standard. Our Supreme Court justices are supposed to be above this sort of thing.


The idea that any race can slander another as a way of getting ahead in politics, let alone being appointed to the Supreme Court, is a sad commentary. That a president would support this "identity politicking" is a disgrace to our constitution and rule of law. However it is understandable when one considers that Obama himself actually made similar racist comments during his campaign. When asked about a comment he made about his white grandmother he said, "The point I was making was not that Grandmother harbors any racial animosity. She doesn't. But she is a typical white person..."


And in his own book he has written the following: "That's just how white folks will do you." And at another point he said, "I ceased to advertise my mother's race at the age of twelve or thirteen, when I began to suspect that by doing so I was ingratiating myself to whites." And then he wrote, "I found solace in nursing a pervasive sense of grievance and animosity against my mother's race." Is it any wonder then that President Obama would want to see someone on the bench who shares his same anger against "the white man"?


Isn't it interesting with all the advances in communications today that it seems harder than ever to actually talk to somebody? You would think that with answering machines, voice-mail, cell phones, texting, e-mail, faxes, instant messaging, etc, etc, that it would be a snap to get a hold of just about anyone you need to talk to. Nope. About the only thing all these electronic devices do, is enable the person whom you are trying to speak to, to screen his calls and thereby be able to avoid you altogether if they so desire. If he or she doesn't want to talk to you, forget about it. "Oh, I never got your e-mail. Are you sure you sent it?" Or "No, we never received your fax. You probably had the wrong number." Or "My answering machine is broken so I haven't gotten any of your messages."


As we all know, the state of California has a money problem - as in they don't have any. The governor and state legislature have definite ideas on how they intend to solve this problem. They plan to raise taxes and fees to the taxpayers and shut down vital services to seniors and children. Well, you know what? I have my own idea. How about cutting off all government payouts and services to ILLEGAL ALIENS? Yeah, how about that? Since we have "a major budget crisis" lets stop giving handouts to people who shouldn't be here in the first place and take care of the CITIZENS of the state. Why punish the people who are US citizens and have played by the rules and worked all their lives putting money into the system? Do I sound cruel? Sorry, but in a crisis we shouldn't kick the honest people in the teeth while we reward the law breakers.

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JWR contributor Greg Crosby, former creative head for Walt Disney publications, has written thousands of comics, hundreds of children's books, dozens of essays, and a letter to his congressman. A freelance writer in Southern California, you may contact him by clicking here.

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