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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review DEc. 11, 2009 / 24 Kislev 5770

The Color of Recession

By Linda Chavez



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | If Jesse Jackson is mad at Barack Obama, the president must be doing something right. Jackson complained this week that President Obama wasn't doing enough to help blacks in a recession that has disproportionately affected black workers. Jackson's major beef, however, seems to be that he was not invited to the White House job summit earlier this month. Join the crowd. The White House didn't invite anyone from the Chamber of Commerce or the National Federation of Independent Businesses either, instead choosing labor union bosses and CEOs that are already reliably in Democratic ranks.


Jackson and black leaders in Congress are becoming increasingly unhappy with President Obama over his failure to play the race card during the recession. In early December, members of the Black Congressional Caucus boycotted a vote in the House Financial Services Committee to express their anger that their colleagues and the White House have not targeted assistance on helping blacks during this recession.


When asked about the caucus vote in an interview with USA Today, President Obama said, "The most important thing I can do for the African-American community is the same thing I can do for the American community, period, and that is get the economy going again and get people hiring again."


I have been very critical of the president on his economic policies, which I think have slowed job creation and threaten to prolong the recession. But in this instance, he is absolutely right. The idea that we need racial quotas or preferences in targeting economic assistance would not only be a disaster as economic policy, it would be unconstitutional. The government has no business directing its aid on the basis of skin color.


It is true that blacks and Latinos have higher unemployment rates than whites, but that is true in good economies as well as bad. The current unemployment rate for blacks is 15.6 percent, 12.7 percent for Hispanics, and 9.3 percent for whites. But the difference between the groups is a reflection of lower skills among black and Hispanic workers — and low-skilled workers are the first to lose their jobs during a recession. There's been no discriminatory policy to lay off jobs for blacks and Latinos, and there should be no target assistance based on race.


I recently debated Jackson on race and the recession at Washington, D.C.'s Newseum. It was obvious during our debate that Jackson still lives in an America of the 1950s and 1960s when racial discrimination was the single biggest problem facing black America. In the bad old days of segregation and Jim Crow, blacks faced obstacles they could not overcome no matter how well prepared or qualified they were. Employers could choose, with impunity, to pass over blacks if their prejudices dictated.


But we are now two generations removed from the era of pervasive racial discrimination. We now have laws that not only forbid such discrimination — and punish transgressors heavily — but encourage employers to take "affirmative action" to ensure that black, Hispanics, and women can compete. Unfortunately, those laws have been turned on their head. The problem now is not that we do too little to help blacks and Hispanics, but that we actually practice reverse discrimination in order to ensure "diversity" in college admissions, employment, and public contracting.


The election of Barack Obama to the highest job in the land is proof enough that we no longer live in an America where racism runs rampant. But for Jesse Jackson and many of the black leaders of his generation, this is not good news. They have made careers out of playing the race card on every issue — and the gig is now up.


There aren't many areas in which I agree with President Obama, but so long as he repeats the message "There is not a black America and a white America … but the United States of America," we should welcome it.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


JWR contributor Linda Chavez is President of the Center for Equal Opportunity. Her latest book is "Betrayal: How Union Bosses Shake Down Their Members and Corrupt American Politics". (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.)

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© 2006, Creators Syndicate

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