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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

The Power of ‘Just’, Part II

By Rabbi Zelig Pliskin



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"The quality of your life is the quality of your on-going self-talk!"

Most people unconsciously engage in internal self-talk, and in this series, best-selling author Rabbi Zelig Pliskin guides the reader to achieve conscious awareness of meandering mental chatter and to transform it into a steady stream of purposeful thought.


Previously, we discussed some phrases that will overcome distress, accomplish despite difficulties, and experience more joy. We listed them. Now, we'll elaborate.


"Just apologize." Sincerely apologizing is the best way to overcome the resentment and negative feelings of someone who is angry with you. However, at times it can be very difficult to apologize. When you tell yourself, "Just apologize," it can become easier. If you really did something wrong, you have an obligation to apologize. At times, it's wisest to apologize even if you aren't really at fault. Your apology can create harmony. Have the strength and courage to "just apologize." Your sincere apology will totally calm some people. Even if you need to apologize a number of times and find the right things to say each time, your initial apology is still the first step forward.


"Just ask." You might find it difficult to ask someone a question or to ask someone to help you out. Telling yourself, "Just ask," might make it easier. Before saying these two words, you might have been debating whether or not to ask. Even though you know you have a right to ask and that it will be beneficial to ask, you feel a bit uncomfortable. As you say to yourself, "Just ask," you might just go ahead and actually ask. In most situations you will find that asking is much easier than you had expected.


"Just be." In some situations you might be trying too hard to impress others. Or you might be overly concerned with how other people see you and what they think about you. You might be causing yourself anxiety and nervousness about how to act and how to project yourself. "Just be" could be the best advice for you at these moments. Don't try so hard. Don't be overly concerned. "Just be" implies that you will just be your real and authentic self. Taking off the unnecessary pressure will enable you to be your best without worrying about it.


"Just bliss." When you say, "Just bliss," to yourself, you might remember how you felt when you experienced blissful feelings in the past. Your mind will access blissful times and moments from your life. Or you might create blissful feelings now, without recalling any specific incidents of being blissful.


As long as you've actually experienced bliss at any time and in any context, right now you might be able to create blissful feelings. You might find that saying these words only a few times won't change your feelings. But if you close your eyes and calmly repeat, "Just bliss," many times, you might be able to create these feelings. This is especially beneficial before praying. When you allow yourself to experience bliss before communicating with the Almighty, it will greatly add to your spiritual experiences.


"Just breathe." You are always breathing throughout the day. Sometimes you are not aware of your breathing. You aren't thinking about it and breathing is not on your conscious mind. But awareness of your breathing enables you to feel a greater amount of gratitude to the Creator for His benevolence and kindness in giving you an abundance of oxygen to keep you alive and well.


Telling yourself, "Just breathe," can be especially helpful when you are anxious or angry. Breathing slowly and deeply melts anxiety and anger. First of all, by focusing on your breathing instead of on the cause of your anxiety or anger, you are not adding to the distressing feelings. Your mind and body work together. So when you consciously breathe slowly and deeply, your brain accesses a calmer state of mind. This also enables you to think with greater clarity. "Just breathe" can be good advice to calm your nerves right before you take a test. Your memory will function at a higher level.


More tomorrow

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