Home
In this issue
December 2, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review December 9, 2013 / 6 Teves, 5774

Life After a Tabloid Scandal

By Diane Dimond




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | I went to a wedding this past weekend, and while you may not immediately recognize the name of the groom, I'll bet you know of him.

Despite a lifetime of obstacles, Gavin Arvizo — once at the center of a sensational child sex abuse scandal — has worked his way through to a triumphant life. At 13, Gavin accused Michael Jackson of molesting him, and the superstar was arrested.

It seemed life was stacked against this kid from the very beginning.

As a youngster he lived in a one-room apartment in East Los Angeles with two siblings and his parents. Poverty and domestic abuse was a way of life.

At the age of 8 this young Hispanic boy and his little brother were instructed by their father to walk out of a J.C. Penny store with clothing that wasn't paid for. Out in the parking lot the boys watched in horror as their father was surrounded by security guards and wrestled to the pavement. His mother, emerging from another store, soon joined in the melee, and both parents were handcuffed and taken to the police station.

At just 10 years old, Gavin was diagnosed with a rare and deadly cancer. As he laid helpless in an L.A. hospital bed feigning sleep, he heard his parents being advised to plan his funeral. Following months of grueling treatments, this plucky kid pulled through.

While in the hospital, the boy's plight came to the attention of the King of Pop. Jackson sent a basket full of toys and good wishes. When he was well enough to travel, the boy and his family were invited to visit the singer's Neverland Ranch. Knowing of their poverty, Jackson even sent a limousine to drive them. What a wonderful respite for a recuperating cancer patient and his exhausted parents!

But once back home, things got worse. Violence. Restraining orders. Divorce. Yet the limousines kept arriving, and the sleepovers in Michael Jackson's master bedroom at Neverland continued.

The rest is history. Authorities in Santa Barbara, California charged Jackson with child sexual abuse, giving intoxicating substances to a minor to facilitate child sexual abuse, conspiracy to cover up the crimes and more.

During the trial Gavin, then 15, was vilified as an accomplished liar. Jackson's lawyer, Tom Mesereau, called him and his family "grifters" and "thieves," and he repeatedly warned the jury that the Arvizos were only "in it for the money."

The jury also heard about two other boys who said they, too, had been molested by Jackson. One was a maid's son, the other the son of an L.A. dentist. Both boys received generous payouts from Jackson in return for keeping quiet. The dentist's family got nearly $20 million.

The defense called a group of young men to the witness stand, leading off with dancer/choreographer Wade Robeson. Each testified they had often slept in Jackson's bed when they were youngsters and nothing sexual had ever happened. Jackson was acquitted of all charges in June 2005.

In a stunning turnaround, Robeson recently admitted he perjured himself at trial. He is attempting to file suit against the Jackson estate, claiming he suffered two nervous breakdowns because of the sexual abuse secret he harbored for so long. During a Today Show interview, Robeson said of Michael Jackson, "He sexually abused me from 7 years old until 14. He performed sexual acts on me and forced me to perform sexual acts on him." Robeson bluntly added, "Jackson was an amazing talent, but he was a pedophile."

To this day attorney Mesereau continues to vilify Gavin as a dishonest character. Nine years later he still ridicules the only youngster with enough courage to have actually gone to court against an international superstar. Mesereau continues to claim Arvizo's allegations were money-driven.

The fact is the defense lawyers and their teams are the only ones who made money from the Jackson criminal case.

Gavin, now 24, has also endured years of being hounded by paparazzi and tormented by a worldwide legion of die-hard Jackson fanatics who have vowed to kill him, maim him and stalk him for the rest of his life for saying their idol molested him.

One of the more vicious fans recently discovered Gavin was about to wed a preacher's daughter and urged others to inundate the church with menacing phone calls about Gavin's integrity.

Gavin steadfastly refuses to speak up for himself, believing a man's actions speak for themselves. So let me tell you a little bit about him.

Gavin worked two and three jobs at a time (in restaurants and landscaping) to put himself though community college. Through sheer perseverance he won partial scholarships to attend prestigious Emory University. He double-majored in history and philosophy, made the honor roll, was president of the student union and he still found time to volunteer frequently at his church.

Gavin doesn't drink, use tobacco, drugs or foul language. He is currently working as a paralegal in a law firm, preparing to take the L-SAT and is applying to more than a dozen law schools. His dream is to go to Harvard.

Most telling about the character of Gavin Arvizo? He has never accepted any of the outstanding six-figure offers to sell his story. Newspapers and television shows continually dangle tempting deals, but Gavin is adamant that the passage of time will best tell his story. He says he knows the truth and believes it will be revealed to the doubters of the world when the time is right.

As I sat in church and watched this resilient young man joyfully take a wife, I thought back to all his trials and tribulations. Poverty, violence, near-fatal cancer, his punishing and unsatisfying ride through the justice system. Amazing.

At the reception, the unknowing DJ played, "The Way You Make Me Feel," by Michael Jackson. I caught Gavin's eye as he sat on the dais with bride, Shelby. He just smiled, grandly shrugged his shoulders and went back to living his life as anonymously as possible.


Previously:


12/11/11 The Cult of the Disgraced and Misplaced
11/03//11 Sunshine Laws Putting Citizens at Risk
10/27//11 Do Prisoners Deserve Free Medical Treatment?
10/17//11 No Justice From Justice
10/12//11 Paying the Price --- Twice
09/26/11 When is Photography a Crime?
09/19/11 Laws to Catch Up With Science

Interested in a private Judaic studies instructor — for free? Let us know by clicking here.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes inspiring articles. Sign up for our daily update. It's free. Just click here.

Comment by clicking here.

Investigative journalist and syndicated columnist Diane Dimond has covered all manner of celebrity and pop culture stories.








© 2013, Creators Syndicate FOOT_DELIMITER ; echo $article_footer; } ?>