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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Dec. 30, 2013 / 27 Teves, 5774

A Crime and Justice Wish List for 2014

By Diane Dimond




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | At the top of my Crime and Justice wish list this year is the sincere hope that America finds a way to become a better functioning and more tolerant country. I wish for the lethargy of the electorate and the deterioration of trust and respect — in our government and in each other — to magically evaporate.

It is a tall order, I know. We live in an ugly era of perpetual backbiting that serves no real purpose but to distract us from finding solutions to very real problems.

Democrats routinely ridicule Republicans and vice versa. Various ethnic groups point to those who are different and declare their problems are the other groups' fault; both heterosexuals and homosexuals complain their lifestyle is under attack; the unemployed and under-employed label business people and corporations as greedy devils without acknowledging they are the very entities providing the most jobs. Our children grow up hearing our viciousness toward one another and are likely to continue the corrosive tradition of intolerance.

I wish for an America where people can enjoy their right to freedom of speech unencumbered by political correctness. I cling to the idea expressed by author Evelyn Beatrice Hall, who wrote, "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."

A recent example of our intolerance is the case of TV personality and proud Christian, Phil Robertson, of "Duck Dynasty." Asked by a magazine reporter what he viewed as sinful he answered, "Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there — bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men," he said. Not a politically correct answer, but his opinion, nonetheless.

Paraphrasing Corinthians, Robertson added, "Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers ... they won't inherit the kingdom of God."

Now, whether you agree with Robertson's beliefs or not, that is his constitutionally protected opinion, and in my America, he is entitled to express it.

The reaction to Robertson's comments, however, was swift and vicious. One leader of a gay and lesbian group attacked the 67-year-old patriarch, saying if people wanted to know why gay teenagers commit suicide they need look no further than Robertson's, "hate that shames them into doing so." The A&E cable network capitulated to the criticism and suspended Robertson from their top-rated program. The reaction was decidedly un-American, in my view.

Moving on, I wish for the NSA to stop all unwarranted surveillance of citizens' activities — forever. Stay away from my emails and phone calls unless there's proof I committed a crime.

I wish for more oversight of the billions being spent by the Department of Homeland Security. I hope that all law enforcement can band together to create a trustworthy, centralized anti-terrorist tracking system to thwart tragedies like the Boston Marathon bombing.



About the gun violence that continues to plague us: I'm heartened to see a renewed discussion about helping the mentally ill who have access to guns. As law-abiding gun owners would tell you, it's a long overdue conversation. I hope we never again hear of a troubled kid shooting up a school, but steel yourself, because it is almost certain to happen.

I wish young people would be required to take conflict management courses so they learn early on how to manage conflict before gun shots, road rage or fist fights break out.

On one hand, I hope I never have to cover another Jerry Sandusky-type child sex abuse trial, but, on second thought, I hope I do. I hope Sandusky's conviction gives strength to all child sex abuse victims to come forward with the truth — no matter what their age is today.

Same with the story about the three missing girls held for so long by the late Ariel Castro in Cleveland. These stories are so hard to hear, but I surely hope more missing people are found alive and reunited with their families.

I wish for a year with a lot fewer frivolous lawsuits (Come on, figure out amongst yourselves who gets the dog in the divorce!) so there is room in our overloaded court system for the truly important cases. And, I hope fewer judges make foolish decisions like the one who decided a drunk kid who caused a fatal car crash should do easy time because he suffers from "Affluenza." That makes about as much sense as a judge accepting a defense attorney's claim of "Poorfluenza."

In preparing this year's list, I looked back through my past New Year's columns and realized many of the things I had wished for are still outstanding. That doesn't curb my hope for solutions to issues like the immigration mess, better border patrol activities, prison over-crowding and reworking our National Sex Registry so that career pedophiles are no longer lumped in with amorous teenagers and drunks who urinate in public.

Happily, some of my past wishes are in the process of coming true. New Mexico, for example, became the 17th state to allow people who love each other to get married no matter what their gender. Several states have moved to decriminalize marijuana as a way to ease prison overcrowding and raise tax dollars. And, dormant DNA rape kits are finally being processed, with the results being included in the national criminal database. Cold cases are being solved because we're finally catching up.

But none of our issues can truly be resolved without my first wish coming true. We have to stop picking fights with each other and start finding common ground to reach common sense solutions. We need a revolution in thinking and behaving that throws off the idea that we should automatically attack someone who thinks differently. It gets us nowhere. And even worse, it weakens the social fabric that has, for nearly 240 years, held this nation together.

We can do better.


Previously:


12/23/13 Divorce American Style
12/16/13 Who Judges the Judges?
12/11/13 Corporations Are Liable, Shouldn't the Government Be Too?
12/09/13 Life After a Tabloid Scandal
12/11/11 The Cult of the Disgraced and Misplaced
11/03//11 Sunshine Laws Putting Citizens at Risk
10/27//11 Do Prisoners Deserve Free Medical Treatment?
10/17//11 No Justice From Justice
10/12//11 Paying the Price --- Twice
09/26/11 When is Photography a Crime?
09/19/11 Laws to Catch Up With Science

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Investigative journalist and syndicated columnist Diane Dimond has covered all manner of celebrity and pop culture stories.








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