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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 29, 2012/ 15 Kislev, 5773

Building a budgetary bridge to somewhere

By Martin Schram




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | We've seen this movie before. Maybe dreamed this nightmare. Or covered this Congress and White House.

We are careening downhill with broken brakes. We are out of control and a cliff is dead ahead.

We are down to one last desperate solution: We must build a bridge to somewhere to save us from plunging over the fiscal cliff and carry us safely to whatever is on the other side.

Here's the good news: We know how to build the bridge. Here's the bad news: We've failed for decades to build it because our leaders haven't had the guts to tell us the truth about what is on the other side.

So today we'll be talking about the tough truths on where we must go and what we must do to get there.

Our Democratic and Republican leaders agree on this much: Our federal debt is soaring and cutting or at least controlling it requires major reforms in how Washington raises and spends money.

And that won't happen until we make some changes in the basic assumptions that underlie our federal tax system and our massive domestic spending programs, called entitlements. Especially Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.

One assumption that must be changed along with reforming the more commonly known entitlement programs is that the wealthiest Americans also get government handouts and these can no longer be considered their automatic entitlements.

Interestingly, a few billionaires made that same case. Indeed, Republican presidential standard bearer Mitt Romney made a proposal during the last campaign that should be a starting point for our income tax reform. Romney proposed cutting the deductions that helped make his own tax rate way less than yours. He proposed a wide range of figures and settled on none of them. Still, that's one small step for billionaire man, one giant step for the rest of mankind.

Moving on to traditional entitlement programs, Democrats and Republicans are in violent agreement about more than they think. Because so many of us are living so much longer than folks lived in the 1930s and 1960s, Social Security will no longer work as a pay-as-you-go program. Medicare too needs ever-increasing federal support. But they must continue to serve all who need them.

It may be time to rethink one big basic assumption underlying Social Security: It really is our key form of income insurance; it provides vital basic income for the ever-expanding group of elderly Americans. But it doesn't work like other forms of insurance we buy because everybody automatically gets its government benefits upon becoming senior citizens. When you pay premiums for health insurance or storm insurance, you know you won't receive benefits unless you have a health or storm problem covered by your policy. Yet, billionaires and multimillionaires with no income problems receive Social Security benefits payments, just like most Americans who need that money to pay basic bills.

Some experts -- and some wealthy Americans -- recommend reducing or eliminating Social Security benefits for those who earn millions annually. Romney also suggested reducing Medicare support for the wealthiest senior citizens.

Those new assumptions show us where we are headed. It's a livable land we can see on the other side of that fiscal cliff. But to get there, we need a bottom line commitment from the president and Congress to save us from the mess they made by rethinking the basic assumptions driving our debt madness. Let them commit to filling in the blanks in 2013. And let their binding bipartisan pact be our bridge to a fiscal somewhere that is, at last, safe and sane.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:


10/24/12: Voters share blame for negative campaigns

10/24/12: Romney displays unusual strategy for winning

10/17/12: Russia drops a bombshell on U.S. nuclear safeguard plan and few notice

10/11/12: A new debate game plan for a new comeback

07/25/12: Washington news, sanitized for officials' comfort

07/18/12: By withholding, Mitt Romney taxes campaign

06/20/12: Cruel consequences spring from an old leak

06/13/12: Gaffes, not facts, dominate presidential race

06/06/12: Command decisions mark new era of video-game warfare

04/25/12: Safeguarding us all in the nuclear age

04/18/12: The battle for the honor of enraging us more

03/28/12: Eavesdropping on diplomacy and politics

02/22/12: Drawing Romney's big picture

01/25/12: Candidates proving that time-tested Marxist theory

01/12/12: Even with primaries still to go, history's longest year starts now

01/05/12: Iowa caucuses reveal news media lapses

12/14/11: How Gingrich stole Mitt's Christmas

11/16/11: Supercommittee's super-sized surrender

11/16/11: Romney talks Texas-tough on Iran

11/03/11: The Silent Majority speaks at last

10/20/11: Outsourcing our democracy; hijacking our holidays

10/13/11: Decline and fall of presidential press conferences

09/28/11: Washington's Monument to broken government

08/17/11: Tax credits for job creation

07/06/11: Obama's on-the-job retraining from Clinton

06/29/11: Obama, Nixon suddenly joined in posterity



© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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