Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 16, 2007 / 6 Kislev 5768

‘Brooklyn Oprah’ leads couples to the altar

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | I have been looking at wedding pictures online. That's how it's done these days. Photographers post digital images on Web sites before champagne glasses clink at the first toast.


They are pictures of radiant couples who became moms and dads before they became husbands and wives. They were recently married as part of the second Marry Your Baby Daddy Day. (Their pictures and quotes are at www.marryyourbaby daddy.com/thefamilies.html.)


Shawn and Patrice: We love each other dearly and realized no time is better than now to take it to the next level.


Marry Your Baby Daddy Day is the creation of author Maryann Reid, dubbed the Oprah of Brooklyn. Interviewing couples with children for a book about male and female relationships, Reid discovered couples who genuinely loved each other and shattered some of the negative stereotypes.


In an effort to strengthen the two-parent home, Reid rounded up corporate backing and threw a wedding — make that capital W — for 10 couples.


Anthony and Jacki: Marriage is our ultimate way to show our family, friends and others we are in it for life.


Looking at all these brides and bridegrooms, I recalled a man who works with youth programs saying that he often sees teens who have never seen a wedding.


Yes, it's always nice to see a wedding, but the children of these recently married couples are about to see so much more.


These kids are about to see moms and dads who just got the yin to their yang. They're going to be front-row witnesses to one of life's greatest adventures: A man and woman committing themselves to one another and to the unknown.


Hopeton and Selena: Marriage is the ultimate commitment between two people who love each other. We are promising to always love and be there for one another, no matter what the circumstances may be.


By joining together, these moms and dads, now husbands and wives, have become two-strong. They have instantly doubled the size of their safety net when a kid gets sick, the school calls, the car won't start, and the garbage disposal throws up.


There is now a dad who has publicly committed himself to his family, to fill a chair at the dinner table, to help provide, make decisions and offer viewpoints from a male perspective.


The boys have someone who will roughhouse with them, teach them how to shave and model what it means to be a man.


The girls will have a template for what constitutes a father and, when the time comes, what to look for in a man.


The kids have received a security blanket of sorts, a father who not only loves them, but lives with them. Somehow the house feels a little safer at night.


By virtue of having two parents anchor a family, there is a framework in place that is nearly magical in what it yields — a dramatically increased probability that the kids will not live in poverty, will do well in school, stay out of trouble with the law, take a pass on illegal drugs and pursue higher education.


But it is the last picture in the online wedding album that tells the best part of the story, the part that stretches beyond all the statistics, likelihoods and probabilities.


It is a picture of two little girls bubbling with happiness, dancing eyes, fancy dresses, and smiles that stretch from ear to ear.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

ARCHIVES

© 2007, Lori Borgman

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles