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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Nov. 28, 2006 / 7 Kislev, 5767

Cross-bearers should claim their opinions as their own, instead of hiding behind dead soldiers

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | This is a great country. Because of the sacrifice paid by U.S. troops, Americans are free to voice their opinions and no government can stop them. Indeed, Americans are even free to make dishonest arguments and hide behind dead U.S. troops as they do so.


I refer, of course, to antiwar opponents who staked some 420 crosses, Islamic crescents and Jewish Stars of David in what they call a memorial to the 2,800-plus U.S. troops who died in Iraq in Lafayette, Calif. City officials told the activists they were free to put up crosses. But when a sign went up — a recent version read: "In Memory of the 2,867 Troops Killed in Iraq" — it broke Lafayette's signage size rules. It was too big.


Since city sign rules apply to all signs, Lafayette told the cross-bearers to downsize the sign by Nov. 20. They refused.


They are protesting. They are special.


Besides, the headline-grabbing brouhaha has given the cross brigadiers what they desire most — the chance to appear as victims without actually being victims.


The Lafayette cross-mongers have not bothered to apply for a permit for a bigger sign, Mayor Ivor Samson told me.


Samson is well aware of the need "to protect freedom of expression." He also understands the need for uniform enforcement of zoning rules.


Be it noted that if the city of Lafayette were to grant a permit for a big memorial sign, other political viewpoints would be entitled to the same exemption. Just as Lafayette cannot and should not limit the "troops killed" sign because of its content, approval of bigger signs would have to apply to all political messages.


"We've been accused of being political, but the sign isn't political," memorial leader Jeff Heaton told The San Francisco Chronicle. "It's a statement of fact."


Heaton admitted that all who put up the crosses were anti-Iraq war, but, "What we're trying to do is remind people there are lives being lost, families being devastated." It doesn't speak well for Heaton and his co-believers that they can't even be honest about what essentially is an antiwar protest that hides behind those brave troops who fell in Iraq. And here's how you know that they are not simply saluting U.S. troops' sacrifice: They forgot the 346 U.S. troops who have died in Afghanistan.


More baloney: "It seems to be an effective way to make people aware of the number of soldiers who died in Iraq," Heaton told The Chronicle.


News stories, real memorials and services for fallen U.S. troops have made the public very aware of the heavy human cost of this war. It is the ultimate conceit to believe that 420 crosses — not even one per dead American — will or can make a deeper impression on the voting public than the stories of those who made the ultimate sacrifice.


Not to mention that many Bay Area families are quite aware of what is going on in Iraq and Afghanistan because they have family members serving there.


They don't need gimmicks to be aware of the risks of combat or the effects of the war against terrorism on American families, thank you very much.


Indeed, if Heaton and company really cared about these families, they would show some respect and sensitivity. They would not exploit the war dead to bolster a viewpoint contrary to those held by most in uniform. They think this charade shows them to be sensitive — and thanks to simple zoning rules, oppressed, but the view from here is: smarmy.


The cross-bearers should claim their opinions as their own, instead of hiding behind dead soldiers.

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© 2006, Creators Syndicate

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