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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 30, 2009 / 12 Mar-Cheshvan 5770

Houses for sale set the stage

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Realtors advise home owners that it helps to sell a house if you can make it look like you don't actually live in the house. Well, at least not too much.


Sellers are encouraged to remove all photographs, knickknacks and personal memorabilia. They are coached to remove books from bookshelves, clear kitchen countertops and pretty well empty the closets to make the place look spacious and attractive to prospective buyers.


I have figured out how this strategy promotes home sales.


Prospective buyers: "Look, Bill, there are no books on the bookshelves. The kitchen countertops are bare and the cupboards are practically empty."


Bill (opening the closet): "It gets worse, Jane. They only have two shirts and one pair of tennis shoes between them."


Jane (weeping): "These people are illiterate, hungry and half-naked, Bill. Let's help them out and buy the place."


Another sold sign goes up in a front yard.


All the preparation to help sell a house is called staging, although it has nothing to do with choosing George Clooney or Richard Gere to play your husband and determining whether Sandra Bullock or Reese Witherspoon would best play you.


Friends recently staged their house for showing by making eight trips to a storage unit. They received rave reviews from their real estate agent. "You'd never know a family with three kids and a dog lived here!" she gushed.


Yes, but if you did know, you would wonder how a family of five got by with only two towels in the linen closet. Then again, maybe you would just assume the children were smelly or had learned to shake off bath water like the dog.


Realtors even suggest homeowners alphabetize their spices and turn all the coffee cups in the cabinet so the handles face the same direction.


We would never be able to move as our house staged itself years ago and refuses to change.


The closet under the stairs chose the stage marked horror. It is dark and creepy and packed with assorted household items that continually rearrange themselves. Periodically an enamel roaster pan that teeters on the top of a shelving unit will crash to the floor in the middle of the night.


We used to jump out of bed screaming, but now I simply open one eye and say, "Maybe I'll pick up a roast tomorrow. Does that sound good?"


Worse, our coffee cups refuse to line up like the Rockettes (the rebellious stage) and the nutmeg and oregano in the spice cabinet think it is a hilarious joke when they switch places (the comedy stage).


It is an undeniable truth, however, that no house looks better than right before you sell it. You finally make all those long-neglected little repairs, tackle that landscaping project, spring for a new garage door and replace those drafty windows. And all for what? For someone you don't even know. You do the work, spend the money, set the stage, and then aren't around to enjoy the show.


A woman losing her house in a divorce settlement said you should never look at a house as a financial investment, but instead focus on making your house the kind of home you always dreamed of.


Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Catching Christmas" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2009, Lori Borgman

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