Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 12, 2007 / 30 Tishrei 5768, 5767

Puppy love — training wheels for doting parents

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | With two of our kids recently married, people ask if I am anxious to become a grandma. I tell them, no, I am quite content being a dog-ma.


You are a dog-ma when your married son and daughter-in-law treat their mutt like a kid. It gives you a small glimpse as to what kind of parents they might one day be.


They found the dog at a Chicago pound. He had no hair on his tail due to a thyroid condition, a slipped disc, back legs that slide out of joint and is sometimes unable to climb stairs.


I see kids who may one day be accepting and patient parents.


The dog barks. A lot. He barks at flying insects, crawling insects, shadows, trucks, motorcycles, semi-trucks, tellers at the drive-through windows, people who raise their voices, anyone dressed like a thug, vacuum cleaners and burning logs that crackle in the fireplace.


When the dog's barking gets annoying, which is often, the son sometimes asks his wife to deal with it as if she has the magic touch.


This well could be an indicator of a father who will often say, "Go ask your mother."


When they travel, they carry enough paraphernalia to put a mother of triplets to shame: leash, a soft towel to put over the parking brake so the dog can cozy up between them in the front seat, prescription medicines, dog snacks in the glove box and an old plastic Steak n Shake cup filled with water that they leave in a cup holder for when he is thirsty.


I see a minivan with a DVD player in their future.


When the dog gets upset, he rips into his toy bag and tries to "finish off" the stuffed possum shaking it wildly. It is the equivalent of a 2-year-old with a combination toy xylophone and drum.


If the dog barks too much inside their third floor condo, they tend to think it's not the dog's problem as much as other people who may have a problem with dogs.


I see a school principal calling.


The last time they were here and we went out to eat, they went through an entire dogproofing routine before we could leave the house.


They blocked off the front room so he couldn't destroy furniture. They shoved the sofa in front of the French doors with mini-blinds do he didn't rip them off the window. Then they closed all the bathroom doors to eliminate any potential water hazards. Then they put purses and backpacks with gum or mints in them on top of the washing machine.


"Do you want to put safety plugs in the electrical outlets before we go?" I asked.


"Don't be ridiculous."


Then they set out a couple of treats and his favorite toy to distract him while they slipped out the door.


When we got back, they immediately both put their hands on the floor tiles in the front hall.


"Looking to see if he left a puddle?" I asked.


"No, we're trying to feel where it is warm to see where he was lying down waiting for us."


I see a young married couple who might one day be head-over-heels parents.


I also see grandkids that may be playing outside a lot when they come to visit Grandma.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

ARCHIVES

© 2007, Lori Borgman

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles