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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 17, 2006 / 25 Tishrei, 5767

And your 2008 hopefuls are ...

By Kathryn Lopez


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Did I miss a year or two? Did I black out? My calendar says it is 2006 but the political talk suggests it is 2008.


I just got back from a swank celebration on Capitol Hill to mark the 10th anniversary of National Review Online, the Web magazine I edit. One of the stars of the night was Mitt Romney, Republican governor of Massachusetts, of whom I've long been fond and whom I have been semi-shamelessly boosting for the White House. More impartial reporters suggest that my 500-strong-conservative-packed party was a hit for Romney. As D.C.'s must-read daily newsletter The Hotline wrote the morning after: "The buzz" about the governor at the party "was almost audible: McCain alternative."


John McCain is a media favorite frequently described as a "maverick," but he's not a favorite of many conservatives (perhaps a mutual feeling, depending on what you're reading). That McCain has never once been on Rush Limbaugh's popular radio program — and has even been accused of attacking the conservative icon at an off-the-record event earlier this year — couldn't possibly help him with conservative primary voters. When the Arizona Republican tried impressing another right wing talk-show host, Laura Ingraham (it was a first appearance on her show for McCain, in contrast to Romney's many), the host very obviously not impressed, in good humor fixated on McCain's going on about the Eagles when her introductory music for him was actually from the Steve Miller Band.


Even as Romney and McCain were courting conservatives, Democrat Mark Warner of Virginia announced that he would not run for the Democratic nomination for president. Warner was talked about as a possible challenger from the right to Hillary Clinton.


At the same time, back on the right side of the political spectrum, my blog colleague John Podhoretz and I relentlessly make the case for our favorite presidential candidates. In his recent book, "Can She Be Stopped ?" (Crown Forum, 2006) — she being Hillary Clinton — Podhoretz insists Rudy Giuliani is the only one who can beat Hillary. I'm not so sure. Fact is, unlike political dorks, most normal Americans don't even know the alternatives to the celebs whose names are so often floated for the White House. There's time, in other words, for them to get to know Mitt.


For what it's worth, I wouldn't even put money on Rudy running. I'm a Manhattan gal and I'll admit there was an undeniable change when he was mayor: On some important urban issues his record is clear and a success story. Rudy, though, before he was "America's mayor," showing real leadership in the wake of 9/11, was not an obvious candidate for a national Republican ticket. As a Washington Post reporter has put it, "Those who think that the 9/11 hero would be a formidable candidate are forgetting about the 9/10 Rudy. Meaning, this is a guy who is pro-choice on abortion, pro-gay rights and moved in with a gay couple after a messy breakup with his wife that came as he was dating another woman."


In time, all will become clear. Rudy won't play in Peoria — and he knows it. McCain, who is already sniping at Romney, will vie with the governor for the nomination. And a wild card like Newt Gingrich may try to spoil the otherwise two-man contest.


There are just over a dozen months now until the Iowa Caucus. But as the example of George Allen demonstrates, a lot can happen in far less time than that. The Republican senator from Virginia was long presumed among the 2008 favorites. Essentially, he and Romney would be dueling to challenge McCain for frontrunner status going into the Republican primaries. But when what was supposed to be a relatively easy reelection contest for him this year went awry thanks to a mix of Allen bungling and old stories about racism as a college kid, his presidential prospects were murdered both by his own hand and by a relentlessly hostile media. Few would have predicted that just last spring.


Still, as the social lives and chosen company of hopefuls makes clear, if your work is getting one of these guys elected, the election might as well be tomorrow.

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