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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 14, 2005 / 11 Tishrei, 5766

Mac program good as its word

By Mark Kellner

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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | There are few things as impressive as the power of word-of-mouth advertising: It can turn an unknown product into a superstar, or at least it can raise the profile of a product other people might not know about.

A good example of this is Textpander, a neat little add-on for users of the Macintosh computer, particularly those running Tiger, the latest version of OS X. Textpander was developed by Peter Maurer, a doctoral candidate at the University of Frieburg in Germany. The software, Mr. Maurer's Web site explains, "is a utility that helps you type more efficiently and more accurately. Textpander listens to what you type and inserts predefined text snippets on the fly whenever you enter their corresponding abbreviation."

Yes, it does that, and quite nicely, thank you. Instead of typing "The Washington Times," I can invoke it with a four-letter combination. Ditto for my name, or for "Very best regards," a complimentary close I use in letters and e-mail. You can get rather fancy and add pictures or text in a certain font; it's a great way, it seems, to add a "real" signature to e-mail and faxes.

Textpander, though not the greatest invention in the history of software, definitely is helpful. You can find it at http://tinyurl.com/axypq. If you like it, Mr. Maurer accepts online donations.

So far, so good — it's your average software utility story. Well, not quite. I first heard about Textpander from Guntis Bukalders, a friend of mine and fellow Mac user in Riga, Latvia. He swears by the program.

The next day, it popped up in a note at http://www.MacOSXHints.com, a very useful Web site run by Rob Griffiths, who is on the staff at Macworld magazine (http://www.macworld.com). Mr. Griffiths knows his software — not to mention OS X — and his recommendation reinforced what my friend Guntis suggested. So I downloaded the program and have been abbreviating happily ever since.

There might be one or two shortcomings. If you become a heavy user, moving to a machine without your abbreviations could be annoying. You'll also have to hunt to find a way to backup your macros, or ‘snippets,’ as the program calls them, but a small menu at the bottom of the preferences panel will help. It's worth the hunt to find.

If you're a Mac user who pops in standard phrases on a regular basis, this might be something to get, and quickly.

AVERY.COM OFFERS PRINTING ONLINE

Sometimes you don't even need software to do a job. When I need to print a CD label, I click over to www.avery.com, and select "Avery Print."

There, label maker Avery Dennison has placed a range of templates for their lines of labels, business and post cards, and other products. Select a design, fill in a few details, click a button and you've got an Adobe PDF file of the final product. Download the file, fire up the free Acrobat Reader and you are ready to print.

The finished product looks quite professional. It's not the same, of course, as doing the design yourself from scratch, and, yes, dedicated software products offer more flexibility. But for "quick and dirty" tasks, the Web site can't be beat.

Such online goodies are worth telling someone else about. It's the original "peer-to-peer" network, you might say, and it's often a good way to get a line on a great computer product.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

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© 2005, News World Communications, Inc. Reprinted with permission of The Washington Times. Visit the paper at http://www.washingtontimes.com

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