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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 27, 2004 / 12 Mar-Cheshvan, 5765

Bubba in a beanie and other acts of desperation in the Sunshine State

By William E. Gibson


How do you say 'pandering' in Yiddish?: Clinton wearing yarmulke
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (KRT) BOCA RATON, Fla. — Greeted by cries of "Shalom!" and "We love you, Bill!" former President Bill Clinton plunged into the political tussle for South Florida's Jewish voters yesterday, one of several prominent visitors intent on tipping the balance of a very close presidential election.


The final scramble for voter support in Florida, the biggest swing state, has drawn candidates and their surrogates almost daily. In this feverish environment, every voter is considered crucial. And in South Florida, Jewish voters took center stage on Tuesday.


While Clinton vouched for Democratic candidate John Kerry at the B'Nai Torah Congregation in Boca Raton, Republican organizers brought in former New York Mayor Ed Koch, a Democrat, to tout President Bush at a rally at Boca Pointe.


Clinton, a major new force on the campaign trail, brought a charismatic presence, an emotional appeal to fervent Democrats and a knack for connecting with wavering voters. His mission on Tuesday was to persuade concerned Jewish voters that Kerry would remain a stout ally of Israel.


The former president made a dramatic entrance from the back of the temple, walking slowly and looking a bit wan, like a man who had undergone major surgery just seven weeks ago.


After an introduction by Kerry's brother, Cameron Kerry, who talked about his own conversion to Judaism, Clinton soaked up the crowd's adoration and stepped to a podium. He began in a low voice, characteristically cracking, which brought a crowd of 1,200 to a respectful hush.


"There is no doubt in my mind that the security of Israel, including its qualitative military superiority, would be unshaken if he (Kerry) were president. You can rely on it, you can take it to the bank," Clinton assured the crowd, sparking a burst of appreciative applause.


"There's also no doubt in my mind that if the newly elected government of Israel finds a partner for peace and decides to go forward, he will be involved in a way that is supportive and in a way that never compromises the defense or the security of Israel."


Clinton praised Israel's decision, approved by its parliament on Tuesday, to remove Israeli settlements from Gaza.


His down-home speech, which focused on U.S. policy in the Middle East, sealed at least one vote for Kerry.


"It reinforced my belief that John Kerry will be extremely supportive of Israel. I think I made my decision as to who I will vote for as of today," said Brad Cohen, 51, of Delray Beach. "I was still undecided until I came here today, and this helped make the decision for me."


Bush backers questioned whether Clinton's visit will sway many voters. "People are not so foolish as to say, `I'll vote for Kerry because of Bill Clinton,'" said Peter Lebowitz, president of the Boca Pointe Republican Outreach, "They like him and love him and may want to vote for him again, but he's not running. John Kerry is running."

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A recent poll by the American Jewish Committee indicated that Bush — a staunch defender of the conservative Israeli government — has gained support from Jewish Americans since he received only 19 percent of the Jewish vote in 2000. The September poll of 1,000 Jewish-Americans found 69 percent favored Kerry and 24 percent favored Bush.


"Bill Clinton's failed policies are part of the reason Israel faces the problems it has," said Edward Kone, a Parkland attorney who came to protest Clinton's appearance. "I like President Bush's policy of isolating (Palestinian leader) Yasser Arafat and not dealing with terrorists."


While bringing the prestige of a former popular president to the campaign trail, Clinton is trying to rev up voter turnout among Democratic loyalists.


"They (Bush campaign monitors) are going to ask every Democrat whether they can prove they are a legal voter and hope some people get tired of standing in line. That's what this is about, you know," Clinton said. " I don't know, maybe somebody should check all of them."


Many in the crowd acknowledged that turnout has become more important than persuading the relatively few remaining undecided voters.


"I don't think Clinton can say much at this point — or Kerry for that matter — to change the minds of voters," said Steve Lippman, 46, of Boca Raton. "I think most people have made up their minds. This just kind of creates a feeling in the air of momentum, just like in sports."

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© 2004, South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Information Services