Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Sept. 26, 2007 / 14 Tishrei 5768, 5767

Military proud

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | So I am chatting with a man and ask if what I hear is true, that his son has joined the military.


"Yes," he says. "He's a Marine."


"Congratulations," I say. "You must be very proud."


We chat a bit longer, not much, and ready to say good-bye, when he says, "You know, you just said something very interesting."


"What's that?" I ask.


"About my son," he says. "You said, 'Congratulations, you must be very proud.' You did say that, didn't you?"


"Of course," I say.


"When most people ask about my son and I tell them he joined the Marines, that's not what they say."


"What do they say?" I ask.


"They say, 'Oh, I'm so sorry.'"


Silence. There is a wound in this man's heart. And it's large. Roughly the size of a walk-in closet.


What an odd lot we are.


If someone said a son or daughter had joined law enforcement, we wouldn't say, "I'm so sorry." We wouldn't offer sympathies to someone whose adult child was training to become a firefighter.


We have a volunteer military. Men and women choose to serve, deliberately and intentionally. That young man set his jaw and chose a path that took him through 13 grueling weeks of boot camp.


Through discipline, will and prowess, he developed strength and agility, learned to handle weapons, practiced marksmanship, mastered combat skills and passed The Crucible - a 54-hour exercise that tests physical and mental strength. He earned the right to be called a Marine.


And what was it I did today?


The father of the Marine is gracious. He cuts those offering their sympathies on his son's achievements a lot of slack.


"I think it's more of a reaction than a thought," he muses.


He's probably right. We all suffer from Blurt, that malady where the mouth works faster than the brain.


Perhaps what they mean is that they are sorry for the anguish the family may go through when their son is 10,000 miles from home, sorry that he will be in harm's way. Still, sympathy is an odd foot to put forward when someone has made a selfless choice requiring courage and fortitude.


Not long ago, I happened upon a sermon preached by a Jacob Cushing at Lexington, Mass., on April 20, 1778, commemorating the anniversary of the Battle of Lexington.


Cushing addressed a congregation at war. Toward the end of his remarks, he singled out the soldiers and said, "Cultivate, my friends, a martial spirit, strive to excel in the art of war, that you may be qualified to act the part of soldiers well; and under providence, be helpful in vanquishing and subduing the enemies of G-d and this people, and be numbered among those who shall be worthy to wear the laurels of victory and triumph."


A far cry from "I'm sorry." And spoken from a pulpit, no less.


Shame on us, no matter what our stance on the war, if we should withhold even an ounce of encouragement or a single prayer from the men and women working to secure liberty and freedom, and make safety an everyday expectation.


There is a common thread woven throughout every branch of the military. It is the thought, or the creed rather, that failure is not an option.


Saying I'm sorry should not be an option either.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

ARCHIVES

© 2007, Lori Borgman

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles