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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 3, 2012/ 15 Menachem-Av, 5772

Rising moon leaves viewers beaming

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | A full moon has always been an event for me, something like a marvelous dessert on lovely china.

When our children were small, we occasionally took nighttime walks to see a full moon, or any moon at all. One evening the moon was in the waning crescent phase, with just under a quarter of it still shining in the sky. A tiny voice said, "Look, Dad — a croissant moon."

Several years ago we were driving through the Ozark Mountains at night. It was nearing 11 and I had fallen asleep. The husband nudged me and said, "Open your eyes." We were climbing a steep hill and at the top loomed a breath-taking moon, enormous, stretched across the night, peering over the hilltop.

Not long ago I was on a flight that hop scotched across the country. We took off from Kansas City as the sun was setting and a full moon was rising. Cattle grazed in fields right next to the runway. It was a bucolic scene, soft green pasture, peaceful cattle, a pink sky and a full moon.

We landed in Chicago amid thick clouds and rain. When we took off again, we soared through the layers and layers of clouds, finally cleared them and there it was waiting, the moon. It was playing a game of cat and mouse, hiding behind the plane. The round white ball bounced a brilliant reflection off the plane's wing. The light of the moon outlined the rim of the plane and hit the rows and rows of ruffled clouds below with a bare bulb top light. It was as though heaven had turned on the porch light.

When my father had cancer, one night he and I sat out back on his patio after dinner. We sat in lounge chairs and watched the moon rise.

I thought of my mother who had died several years earlier. She once told my dad that after they both died, they should agree to meet behind the moon. He said that was fine, but she was never where she said she'd be.

We sat without words watching the moon. The silvery orb was tinged with pink against a turquoise sky. Slowly, the moon warmed to a rich buttery yellow and the sky darkened to a deep emerald blue. We sat there for a long time, not saying a word, just watching another day slip into the shadows while the moon rose to light the night.

The bugs started biting, so we got out of our chairs and headed inside when we noticed that the sun had been setting behind us. It was a lovely sunset with peach and apricot clouds streaking the sky, but we'd been enjoying the moon.

We're geared toward the big show, spectacular sunrises and sunsets with their fire bursts of color. The moon is the off-Broadway production without the big budget and splash reviews, but it still delights. That shouldn't be any surprise. Beauty and quiet pleasures are often found in unexpected places.


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JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Catching Christmas" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2012, Lori Borgman

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