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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 7, 2008 / 6 Menachem-Av 5768

Light of suspicion shines on a shiny bird

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | There were three witnesses to the loss — a rabbit, a grackle and a dog. Oh, it's not like they were any help. The dog simply peered through the fence, the rabbit took off running and the grackle stayed to sneer.


I'd forgotten about the unfortunate incident until a woman in line at the grocery store mentioned losing the diamond from her ring. She was pretty sure it went into a batch of lasagna she was making for company. She planned on telling her dinner guests not to swallow .


The checker said that she had recently lost the diamond out of her ring, too, while working at the store. Fortunately, she found it on the floor right next to her feet.


My mom lost the diamond to her ring once. She scoured the house, emptied the vacuum bag, sorted through the trash and gave it up as lost. A week later, she opened a kitchen drawer and there was the diamond nestled between two placemats.


My ring used to fit loose. It would spin to the back of my finger, and I would subconsciously flick it back into place with my pinkie. One day, walking into the house from the garden, I gave the ring a spin and felt a jab. Four naked prongs, no diamond.


Retracing my steps I was able to calculate that the stone was somewhere in the backyard, hiding in an expanse of Kentucky Bluegrass, clover, and broadleaf weeds.


Craig'slist is full of ads from women pleading for help finding their lost diamonds. They've been lost in swimming pools, shopping malls, parking lots, on freeway exit ramps, at McDonald's, and the ballpark. One ad says, "Last seen in the lake, 15-foot-deep area."


Yes, diamonds are a girl's best friend, right up until you lose them.


And here's a question: How many best friends is a girl supposed to have these days? If you listen to the radio commercials, every woman needs an engagement diamond, a Mother's Day diamond, a forever diamond, a 25th anniversary diamond, a right hand diamond, a Christmas diamond, an I-did-the-laundry diamond and an empty nest diamond (I made those last two up, just in case the husband is reading.)


If women had all the bling the advertisers say we should have, we'd have jewels encrusting every finger, dangling from our noses and circling our toes.


Me? I couldn't hang onto one.


I crawled every square inch of backyard on my hands and knees. I crawled it again with a neighbor, two more times with a friend who drove across town, and again with the husband before the sun went down.


It was a steady parade of adults crouched on all four, backsides thrust high in the air, like giant anteaters slowly noshing their way through the yard.


As we hunted and searched, an ugly grackle with a iridescent green and purple sheen sat watching from a tree. His metallic back glistened brighter and brighter as the day wore on. He wore a smart-aleck smirk and cackled from time to time. It was as if he had some delicious secret he was dying to tell.


We never found the diamond, but eventually, I put two and two together. Maya Angelou wrote a book titled, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." I'm going to write a book titled "I Know Why the Gloating Grackle Shines."

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2008, Lori Borgman

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