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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 13, 2010 / 2 Menachem-Av, 5770

Isn't is fascinating how self-styled ‘progressives’ so often look backward?

By Jack Kelly

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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The transformative event in modern American politics was the Great Depression. It made the Democratic party the majority party, and changed its nature.

In 1928, Republican Herbert Hoover was elected in a landslide, with 58.2 percent of the popular vote, and 444 electoral votes to 87 for Al Smith. Democratic victories were confined to six states in the heart of Dixie, and Massachussetts.

Republicans gained 7 seats in the Senate that year, to take control of that body, 56-42. Republicans gained 32 seats in the House to control there, 270-164. Such Democrats as there were in the House were mainly southern conservatives.

By 1936, the political world had been turned upside down. Franklin Roosevelt was re-elected with 60.8 percent of the vote. He carried every state but Vermont and Maine. Democrats controlled the Senate, 76-17, and the House, 334-88.

Though he'd sought the presidency on a platform to the right of the GOP, FDR swiftly moved left once he'd won the office. That proved politically popular, even though many economists think his policies prolonged the Depression (which didn't end until mobilization for WWII).

The philosophy of "tax and tax, spend and spend, elect and elect" (as expressed by Roosevelt adviser Harry Hopkins to columnist Arthur Krock) has proven durable. Despite setbacks in 1946 and 1980, the Democratic majority endures. Ronald Reagan slowed the growth of the welfare state. But not even he tried to dismantle it.

Since it has brought them more than 70 years of political success, Democrats are understandably nostalgic for the Hopkins' approach, which was epitomized by President Barack Obama's failed $862 billion "stimulus" bill.

Here is how Rep. Paul Kanjorski, D-Pa, described the Democrats' approach to dealing with the recession triggered by the subprime mortgage crisis:

"All we are doing is going into the basket and saying, 'Damn, what did they do in '32, what did they do in '34, and what did they do in '36, and we're pulling them out, dusting them off, giving them a paint job, and we're using them…" Mr. Kanjorski said at a conference in May, 2008.

Isn't is fascinating how self-styled "progressives" so often look backward?

But economic conditions now are different from what they were in the 1930s. Deficit spending didn't end -- and did little to ease -- the Great Depression. But deficit spending wasn't obviously insane then, because the federal government had little debt. With a national debt of more than $13 trillion, and federal budget deficits projected to reach 62 percent of GDP by year's end (and 80 percent by 2035), it's obviously insane now.

"I don't know that (economist John Maynard) Keynes was ever right that government spending could jolt an economy out of a liquidity trap," wrote Megan McArdle, economics editor for the Atlantic. "But even if he was, that doesn't mean he'd still be right -- the political economy might have changed too much for his prescriptions to work."

The states where Democrats have most assiduously followed the Hopkins' formula -- California, Illinois, Michigan, New York -- are bankrupt, or nearly so. A lot of people are now thinking the once unthinkable thought of a federal default. We're fast approaching -- if we haven't arrived already -- at the end of the economic viability of the welfare state.

We can't continue on the path we're on, so we'll either descend into socialism or fascism, or restore the constitutional government the Founding Fathers intended. Another transformative event is at hand.

Since we turned to big government for answers during the Great Depression, Democrats are betting we'll turn to government to get us out of the Great Recession.

So far, it's a bet Democrats are losing. Polls indicate Americans, by substantial pluralities, want lower taxes, less regulation, and smaller government.

Democrats seemed genuinely surprised that their "historic" takeover of health care is unpopular. But they're catching on. That's why they're planning to postpone action on a VAT tax, cap and trade, and card check until a lame duck session after the election.

But if Democrats attempt to impose such unpopular measures after suffering massive defeats in the midterms, they could spend as much time in the political wilderness as Republicans did after the stock market crash of 1929.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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JWR contributor Jack Kelly, a former Marine and Green Beret, was a deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force in the Reagan administration.

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