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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 14, 2008 / 11 Tamuz 5768

What's driving Jackson nuts?

By Mitch Albom


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | There aren't too many things that would make me say of a fellow man, "I want to cut his n—-s off." So when I heard Rev. Jesse Jackson was caught mumbling that very threat towards Barack Obama (into a microphone that Jackson didn't know was on) I figured, wow, Obama must have dropped a doozy.

He must have insulted Jackson's mother.

He must have ripped Jackson's manhood.

Instead, what Obama actually said was not about Jackson at all, but rather a speech imploring black Americans to take more responsibility for their children.

"Too many fathers are AWOL, missing from too many lives and too many homes," Obama reportedly told congregants of a Chicago church. "They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it....

"You and I know how true this is in the African-American community. We know that more than half of all black children live in single-parent households, a number that has doubled — doubled — since we were children."

Well. I can see why Jackson would want to castrate somebody over that.

I must confess, I have long wondered what Jesse Jackson stands for besides Jesse Jackson. We in the media have been far too lazy in sticking a microphone in front of Jackson any time we think there is a "black" issue that needs commenting, as if he were somehow voted in by the black population as its official spokesman.

Time and time again, I am told by African-Americans, "Jackson doesn't speak for me." But in the case of the Obama insult, Jackson professed to be speaking for others, claiming Obama "talks down to black people."

You'll have to excuse me if I think that telling anyone — black, white or purple — that they need to take responsibility for the children they father is "talking down" to them. What would Jackson have us do? Ask more nicely?

Jackson, in the aftermath of his microphone snafu, said this in a written statement: "My appeal was for the moral content of (Obama's) message to not only deal with the personal and moral responsibility of black males, but to deal with the collective moral responsibility of government and the public policy."

That's a lot of fancy words for this: Why blame individuals when we can blame society?

Which is a fancy way of saying this:

Don't cut in on my business, Barack.

Because without blaming society, Jesse Jackson has to seriously downsize his shop. He has made a career out of pointing fingers (and, yes, some has been deserved). But when a fellow-African-American leader — and suddenly a more popular one — starts preaching responsibility, Jackson's "blame society'" approach rings hollow.

And if you don't think Jackson is worried about Obama eroding his power base, why was he moved to say, "I want to cut his n—-s off." You don't say that when you disagree with someone's philosophy.

You say that when you perceive a threat.

And the more Obama succeeds, the less Jesse Jackson may find himself in demand. Apparently, that bothers the heck out of him.

Or maybe Obama's comments struck too close to home. After all, Jackson himself fathered a daughter out of wedlock and secretly supported her financially until the story broke.

Given that, his reaction to a call from Obama for parental responsibility should have been a hearty "Amen."

Instead, he wanted to separate Obama from his you know what — perhaps because he feels Obama is, power-wise, doing it to him.

Either way, the days of Jesse Jackson, Spokesman For All Black People, are coming to an end. The media is wising up. Jackson's own hypocrisies, from the illegitimate child to the "Hymietown" controversy, are stacking too high. And if, come next year, we have an African-American president representing all of us, hopefully we'll see the silliness of running to one self-anointed individual to represent a group of us.

In the meantime, note this statement from one particular critic of Jackson's comments:

"I thoroughly reject and repudiate his ugly rhetoric. He should keep hope alive and any personal attacks and insults to himself."

That came from Jackson's son, Jesse Jr., a congressman. The Reverend might want to spend more time listening to the fruit of his loins, and less time focusing on Obama's.

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