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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 27, 2007 / 12 Menachem-Av, 5767

You take the cake

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Should you ever decide to help your daughter bake her own wedding cake, the first thing you should know is that a deluxe Scrabble board on a swivel stand will not spin while holding the weight of a four-layer 12-inch cake. No, not even if you center it on a triple-word-score.


The second thing you should know is how to deactivate the alarm system of your neighbor's house before the police get there. That's right — the same neighbor who said you were free to use her oven, to just let yourself in. I'm sure these kinds of things happen to professional bakers all the time. You know, they find themselves standing on a chair to get a better angle at trimming a cake, they go ballistic because they think they saw a gnat by the bananas.


Or — and this is one I'm sure happens a lot — one person is leveling the cake top with an electric knife and that person's mother is slowly turning the cake table, simultaneously lifting the dome part of the cake upward, when the one wielding the electric knife suddenly cuts up from beneath the dome and NEARLY CUTS OFF HER MOTHER'S FINGERS!


"Why, yes, we had a lovely time making the wedding cake together. What's that? These stubs on my right hand? Oh, they're nothing really. All in a day's cake."


Someone suggested we watch the television show "Ace of Cakes" before embarking on this endeavor. I told the girls that I had seen the show once and it was totally irrelevant to what we are doing.


"Those people are beyond professionals," I said. "They are confectionary ar-teests! They could do Mt. Rushmore in cake at full scale. What we are doing is basic," I said. "No, it's below basic. What we are doing is Cake for Dummies."


When we announced our intent to bake a wedding cake to serve 300, family and friends offered enthusiastic and warm support, saying, "You must be out of your minds."


Why wouldn't we hole up in the kitchen for two days to grease and flour pans, mix batter, cut cakes, fill them, crumb coat them, and double and triple wrap them for the freezer?


The kitchen is where we have talked about clothes and curfew and coming of age. where they have learned that variety is the spice of life, to keep trying new things. That cooking mistakes are among the few you don't have to live with — use the garbage disposal. That simple can be elegant and fresh is best. That half-baked is never good, be it recipes, ideas or people.


The kitchen was the place she stood late at night in December and announced that she knew for certain and with perfect peace that he was the one.


Friends popped in during our two-day undertaking, asking, had there had been any tensions, fighting or crying. In "A League of Their Own," Tome Hanks said, 'There's no crying in baseball!" Well, there's no crying in cake-baking either.


Forty-one cake mixes, 9 pounds of butter, 14 dozen eggs, 32 cups of raspberry filling, this wedding cake will be a symbolic token of the bride and groom's first shared meal, a taste of the sweetness that lies ahead.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2007, Lori Borgman

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