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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 17, 2006 / 21 Tamuz, 5766

The faces of American heroes

By Kathryn Lopez


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Leave all your Oliver Stone biases at home when you go see his new film "World Trade Center." It's all-American and well-timed. This September will mark the fifth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on American soil. And Americans — unless they happen to have a family member deployed or had lost someone on 9/11 — don't generally seem to have a keen sense that we're at war. This movie reminds us we are.


"For no other reason than it was the right thing to do." These are the last words spoken by one of the film's stars, Nicolas Cage, about the rescue workers who risked their lives, coming from near and far, to save the only 20 people who ultimately would be rescued from the rubble — words that parallel Rick Santorum's steadfastness in the Senate.


Santorum, R-Pa., is up for re-election this year in one of the country's most contentious races. He's behind and he's a lightning rod. But agree or disagree with him on the issues — abortion (he's against), the war we're in (he's a better articulator of it than most of the White House) — you'll have to agree there's something fundamentally American about him.


Because he takes the lead on especially controversial issues, Santorum is vilified. He brings some of this on himself, mind you, by choosing the issues he's going to go out on a line for; but he'll tell you he's just doing the right thing.


Santorum attracts much more than his share of nastiness. Google his name right now and you'll get a sense of what he and his family have to put up with. His wife, G-d bless her, encourages him in his desire to serve. But it's a sacrifice for more than the senator.


It is a choice, of course. But when you ask him why the heck he wants a job that entails so much abuse and so much frustration — some of the latter caused by his own party — he responds knowingly, but with an obvious humility: "Right now is an important time in the history of our country," he explained, with a sense of something bigger than himself he is participating in and being guided by. He believes he has made a positive contribution as a senator and has something more to offer. Going from Iraq discourse to just talking to Americans, he explained that, for him, political service is the right thing. And that's what he knows he ought to do. Because that's what we do.


He's not alone, thankfully, even in D.C. If you don't believe me, join me at a watering hole next time you're inside the Beltway. I'll introduce you to some of the most motivated, smart, (partisan, yes! I'd want them no other way) young people in this country — men and women who love America and serve it as key Hill staffers.


They work thankless hours and endure some ugly blows, but when you've got deeply held principles guiding you, you can handle it.


And that's exactly the kind of guys I want representing me in the people's body — the same kind of person who would go down to the World Trade Center as disaster struck — the same kind of guy who would risk his life in the military. Those guys on 9/11 Stone depicts had to endure something in intensity and whose horror most of us, thankfully, will never know. But they are the same kind of person you'll find all across the fruited plain who values teamwork, faith and family, who wants to do the right things.


You can be Democrat or Republican and agree that's what an American should admire in another — in our rescue workers, in our politicians, Democrat or Republican, Hollywood producer or senator. Because at heart, that's just who we are.

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