Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 1, 2005 / 24 Sivan, 5765

New Mac portable worth a tryout

By Mark Kellner

Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The early summer heat radiates from the pavement here even after the sun has gone down. When checking into a hotel, a traveler is comforted by two things: a chilling air conditioner and free wireless Internet access.

A third thing comforts as well, Apple Computer's $1,699, 12-inch PowerBook, a tiny traveler that will be my companion for the next couple of weeks. Walking around a major event, I was in need of something smaller and a bit lighter than my normal notebook. You might have a similar need. If so, this PowerBook is worth examining.

Unlike the "titanium" PowerBook I normally use, this new model is encased in aluminum. It looks a bit sleeker than its predecessor — some might say chic — and there are other nice visual and practical touches. The click button for the touchpad is raised above the pad, making it easy to find — but a constant reminder when typing. The optical drive is on the right side of the unit, not the front, while connectors for all sorts of ports are on the left.

There are two hard plastic, very tiny "feet" at the top of the screen, making sure there is some space between the keyboard and the liquid-crystal display. This is important to help prevent dirt from transferring from the keyboard onto the screen. It's a "dirty secret" of computing: Our fingers have oils and dirt that stay on the keyboard after use. If the keyboard gets in contact with the screen, this stuff may mar the surface. Although I still would use a keyboard cover such as the $14.95 ScreensavRz from www.radtech.us for ultimate safety and convenience, the Apple improvement is helpful.

How well does the PowerBook perform? Quite nicely. The 1.5 GHz PowerPC processor is a nice one, but I'd love to see what the faster 2.0 GHz model could do. That Apple is making 512 megabytes of RAM a minimum for all its PowerBook portables is a very important step; you really need that amount to have a happy computing experience, and it's not expensive. A total of 1.25 gigabytes of RAM can be installed in the machine, Apple says.

Donate to JWR


The base model of the 12-inch PowerBook, list price $1,499, has only a 60 gigabyte hard-disk drive and an optical drive that reads DVDs and reads/writes compact discs. I'd spend the extra $200 for a 20 gigabyte upgrade on the hard drive (80 gigabyte total) and the optical drive that will burn CDs and DVDs. It will prove to be a smart move in the long run, I believe.

If there is any shortcoming in this PowerBook, I'd have to say it is in the audio. If you were you to buy the 12-inch PowerBook as a desktop replacement — a computer used primarily in one place, but portable if necessary — you would want to buy some external speakers and, of course, an external monitor. The PowerBook includes an external connector that plugs into a miniature video port on the side of the machine.

There are arguments to be made for buying a larger notebook, whether it runs with Mac or Windows.

But if size and style are your priorities, the 12-inch PowerBook is a very good buy.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

Archives

© 2005, News World Communications, Inc. Reprinted with permission of The Washington Times. Visit the paper at http://www.washingtontimes.com

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles