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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Superglue helps doctors save infant's life

By Zach Murdock





JewishWorldReview.com |

P ANSAS CITY, Mo.— (MCT) Surgery — and superglue — saved 3-week-old Ashlyn Julian's life this week.

The little girl was suffering from a rare, life-threatening condition in infants, and a team of doctors at University of Kansas Hospital needed to stop bleeding in her brain. Surgical superglue was the answer.

Doctors at KU, led by pediatric neurosurgeon Koji Ebersole, believe fewer than 20 procedures similar to the one that saved Ashlyn's life have been documented in medical literature. The procedure is so rare that this may be the first time superglue has been used to repair an aneurysm in an infant's brain.

That was on Wednesday. On Friday, Ashlyn was recovering in a hospital room, trying to nap while outside the door her parents wiped away tears and thanked Ebersole.

"I can't express how incredibly lucky and graced we are," said Ashlyn's mother, Gina Julian.

Ashlyn was born without complications on May 16. She was released to go home to Olathe, but in the following weeks it was clear something was wrong. She was tired and vomiting.

Her parents took her at least once to Children's Mercy South before it became clear the problem was serious, Gina Julian said. An MRI at another Children's Mercy location revealed an aneurysm the size of an olive.

Brain aneurysms in children are extremely rare because they typically develop over many years, Ebersole said. Doctors don't know exactly why these aneurysms happen, and Ebersole explained they may never know why it happened to Ashlyn.

Because brain bleeding is so rare in infants, there aren't even pediatric tools for the procedure. Instead, doctors must use the smallest adult equipment available.

Surgery to repair the aneurysm began Wednesday morning after Ashlyn experienced a second traumatic hemorrhage.

On Friday afternoon, Ebersole explained the procedure in detail to Ashlyn's parents for the first time.

Doctors from several hospitals were on the team. Surgeons first inserted a tiny catheter into a blood vessel in Ashlyn's right hip. From there, Ebersole navigated the catheter through Ashlyn's blood vessels and up into her neck.

Using a sophisticated brain imaging machine that shows the brain's highlighted blood vessels from two angles, Ebersole navigated a microcatheter through Ashlyn's brain and up next to the aneurysm itself.

There, Ebersole was able to deposit the sterile surgical superglue on the affected blood vessel. The glue dried in seconds and created an internal cast, sealing the blood vessel.

"It's literally the same compound as the superglue you'd find in the store," Ebersole said.


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The most common treatment for a brain aneurysm is to open a patient's skull and operate on the aneurysm. But because Ashlyn is so young, the blood loss involved in open surgery would have put her at considerable risk, Ebersole said. Instead, Ebersole believed he could treat the bleeding from the inside.

The procedure took less than 45 minutes once the catheter was inserted.

"I can actually breathe for the first time in a week," Gina Julian said.

Jill Chadwick, a spokeswoman for the University of Kansas Medical Center, said the procedure was so rare that Ebersole probably will never do it again. He does intend to write about it for the medical community, she said.

The next step for Ashlyn is to return to Children's Mercy, where the blood spilled by the aneurysm into the brain's spaces will continue to drain. In another six months, doctors will check on Ashlyn, but Ebersole says she will probably never have trouble with the aneurysm again.

"I think she's going to have a perfectly normal life," Ebersole said.

Lulling Ashlyn to sleep on Friday afternoon, Gina and Jared Julian breathed a sigh of relief.

"All right, sweetheart, you're pretty amazing," she said.

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