Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Dryer vent cleaning

By Angie Hicks




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) Ray Terry estimates he's personally inspected and repaired more than 4,000 dryer vents over the past 16 years as the owner of The Almetal Dryer Vent Corporation in Charlotte, N.C., and he's seen one common problem over and over again that helps contribute to more than 15,000 dryer vent fires annually.

"In the owner's manual of dryers manufactured in America, it tells you explicitly not to use flex hose," Terry says.

The flex hose is the white or foil-looking ribbed flexible hose that runs from the back of the dryer to the vent in the wall. Homeowners should replace those hoses with the semi-rigid metal hose now recommended by dryer manufacturers nationwide.

"Flexible hoses catch more lint, therefore clogging your vent up on airflow and overheating your dryer," Terry says. "Dryer fires are caused by lint buildup. When you have lint buildup in the vent, the air will not flow, therefore the element overheats. When the element overheats, it ignites the residual lint in the vent and you have a dryer vent fire."

Dryer vents should be inspected and cleaned at least every two years, more often if you have a large family or do large amounts of laundry, says Bob Bryfogle of Dryer Vent Wizard of Central Texas, in Austin.

"For one thing, it shortens the drying times, so you don't have to wait so long for clothes to get done," Bryfogle says. "Another reason is it saves on energy costs. Typically, if it takes two cycles to dry the clothes and you have the dryer vent cleaned and it then only takes one cycle to dry the clothes, it reduces the cost for the average family by $18 to $24 a month. So, if you're saving $20 a month, over a year you're saving $240 in energy costs. And because you're using the dryer less, it extends its life."

The size of the home, length of the vent and how easily accessible it is can factor into the cost of a cleaning, but most dryer vent cleanings range from about $80 to $200. The cost will more than pay for itself in energy savings and in the money homeowners will save on repairing or replacing their dryers. Terry says it's not uncommon for him to get a call from a befuddled homeowner who just purchased a new dryer thinking their old one was no longer working, only to find the new unit still isn't drying their clothes as quickly as it should.

"Anytime a clothes dryer takes longer than 45-50 minutes to dry a load of cotton, be it towels or blue jeans, it's not the clothes dryer, it's the vent," Terry says. "I've gone in several homes and there's a new dryer sitting there waiting on me. They didn't need a new dryer. They just needed their vent cleaned. Unfortunately most people don't know it and when their dryer is not performing adequately, they think it's the dryer and go buy a new one."

Homeowners can keep their dryers operating efficiently by taking a few steps on their own, including cleaning the lint screen before and after each load. An obvious signs of a dryer in need of an inspection is longer drying times, but a dryer that's hot to the touch during use or one that produces clothes that are hot, damp and smell musty is also likely in need of a vent cleaning.

"Another symptom is if you see a lot of lint on inside of the dryer door," Bryfogle says. "That's an indication it's not leaving the dryer like it should."

A homeowner hiring a professional vent cleaning company should expect a full inspection before any work is done to ensure their vents actually do need cleaned. A qualified company should inspect the dryer starting from the lint trap all the way to the roof, attic, crawlspace or exterior wall where it vents and present a report to the homeowner identifying possible issues or areas of concern.

Terry and Bryfogle both say their primary goal is to educate homeowners on the importance of a regular vent cleaning.

"I venture to say we're wasting more energy in this country on our clothes dryers than every (other appliance) combined in a residential setting," Terry says. "I educate people, not only to make homes safer, but they'll use a lot less energy and help our country and world be a better place."

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

To comment or ask a question, please click here.

Since 1995, Angie Hicks has been dedicated to helping consumers get the real scoop on local service companies and health providers. Inspired by the frustrations her co-founder had trying to find reliable contractors in suburban Columbus, Ohio, she started Angie's List to help homeowners find who they should hire and who they should avoid.


Previously:


Home automation
Central Vacuums
Know signs of a qualified locksmith
Mold Testing and Remediation


Most water softeners are fully automatic
Property sealing your home's envelope
New thermostats can 'learn' home's routine

© 2013, http://www.angieslist.com/ Distributed by MCT Information Services

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles

Quantcast