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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 6, 2012/ 16 Sivan, 5772

Command decisions mark new era of video-game warfare

By Martin Schram




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | War is not the hell it used to be. At least not for a relative few who have become prime U.S. military combatants without ever seeing combat or even a combat zone.

It is their minds, eyes and hands that direct the increasing number of pilotless, soldierless airborne drone attacks deep inside isolated terrorist pockets deep inside Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere — targeting suspected terrorist leaders believed to be plotting our mass murder.

These war combatants guide lethally armed drones with a video-game pinpoint precision that makes war, from their end of it, seem antiseptic and almost surreal. But at the other end, we know there will inevitably be civilians — innocents — whose misfortune was that terrorist leaders chose to hide in their midst. Their reality is that the terrorists' war became their hell.

(To which, we can and must respond, that must be exactly what it felt like for the 3,000 innocents on 9/11 when death by terrorism came hurtling out of the sky.)

So this is where we are today — caught up in an era of drone warfare that we know is highly controversial, yet, we also know, is here to stay. And we know that our safety depends upon their intelligence and accuracy being spot-on. As it apparently was Monday, when a drone strike in Pakistan's tribal areas of North Waziristan reportedly killed al-Qaida's No. 2 commander, Abu Yahya al-Libi. Pakistani officials said at least 15 persons died in the attack.

All of the above is why President Barack Obama has made it his solemn duty to review all the intelligence and personally order every drone strike. He could have delegated (see also: ducked) this ultimate responsibility. After all, there can be no certainty that the intelligence is flawless. And innocents surely will be killed in the strike. But this president decided it was the duty of the commander in chief and no one else. For that, all Americans — even opponents and critics — owe him respect.

Because controversies over U.S. drone policies will reverberate throughout this election year, we need to know the questions and where we stand:

One: Should a president be able to order what amounts to assassinations of individuals, including American citizens, who may be working with terrorist groups, far from any traditional war zone? The New York Times editorial board said "no" the other day. But when you got past the editorial headline, its final position was that Obama should publish his guidelines for targeting individuals for drone attacks and allow an outside court to review evidence against Americans on that list. That seems reasonable to me, because I can visualize what could happen if an unreasonable president made those decisions alone. After all, an enraged President Richard Nixon several times ordered his chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman to have the Brookings Institution, a moderately liberal Washington think tank, firebombed! Still, a checks-and-balances system cannot be unwieldy and must produce decisions with reasonable rapidity.

Two: Do drone strikes create animosity among populations in Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere? Yes — news reports show that drone attacks have been followed by increased expressions of support for terrorist groups. But that doesn't mean the U.S. should halt all drone strikes. It mainly means that Washington must work vigorously on public diplomacy campaigns — to spread the message of American support for the countries and their citizens and Western aid for all efforts to ensure that terrorists will not have safe havens in these lands.

Three: Will there come a day when terrorist enemies of America and the West have drone technology and capability? Probably, but experts say it isn't imminent. The controversy recently surfaced when the Obama administration agreed to arm Italy's Reaper surveillance drones with Hellfire missiles and precision-guided bombs. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., cautioned that it could lead to the proliferation of this weaponry. She said the technology shouldn't be shared. I agree.

We need to do all we can to ensure that today's warfare reality doesn't become tomorrow's warfare nightmare.

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Previously:


04/25/12: Safeguarding us all in the nuclear age

04/18/12: The battle for the honor of enraging us more

03/28/12: Eavesdropping on diplomacy and politics

02/22/12: Drawing Romney's big picture

01/25/12: Candidates proving that time-tested Marxist theory

01/12/12: Even with primaries still to go, history's longest year starts now

01/05/12: Iowa caucuses reveal news media lapses

12/14/11: How Gingrich stole Mitt's Christmas

11/16/11: Supercommittee's super-sized surrender

11/16/11: Romney talks Texas-tough on Iran

11/03/11: The Silent Majority speaks at last

10/20/11: Outsourcing our democracy; hijacking our holidays

10/13/11: Decline and fall of presidential press conferences

09/28/11: Washington's Monument to broken government

08/17/11: Tax credits for job creation

07/06/11: Obama's on-the-job retraining from Clinton

06/29/11: Obama, Nixon suddenly joined in posterity



© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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