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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 15, 2010/ 3 Tamuz 5770

Imagine that

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | It could turn out to be a good thing.

According to CNNMoney.com, the traditional full-time job with benefits is being displaced by temporary or contract positions.

With unemployment high, you see, employers have their pick of skilled workers. Why hire full-timers and fund costly benefits when they can pay a flat hourly or monthly rate instead?

Few full-time employees are aware of it, but their benefits package -- health, life, dental and disability insurance, "free" college tuition, workers' compensation insurance, 401(k) matching, etc. -- is income.

An employee who earns $70,000 in annual salary is probably costing his employer closer to $100,000 total.

Employers also must pay half of the 15.3 percent FICA tax (Social Security and Medicare combined). Though half of that 15.3 percent is paid by the employer and half by the employee, the brighter employees understand that all of the FICA tax is coming out of their pockets.

Employers also must comply with a multitude of government mandates -- such as providing health insurance under President Obama's new plan -- that make them wary of hiring full-timers.

Firing an unproductive employee, for instance, could open them up to a host of costly lawsuits.

Why bother with such burdens and risks when they can simply hire a contractor?

They can part with the contractor if work slows -- part with him if his work is poor -- and not have to worry about getting sued.

To be sure, government meddling has caused employers to prefer contractors over employees -- but wouldn't the country be better off if every worker were a self-employed contractor, if only for a little while?

I've been self-employed for many years. For the past 11 years, I've contracted my services to a large technology firm in Virginia.

I manage my own invoicing and taxes. I know to the penny -- once my CPA, Tommy O, shows me -- how high my income taxes are. Local, state, federal, FICA -- most years, I could pay cash for a late-model Lexus with what I owe to the government.

I manage my own health care. I shopped around for the best policy -- a high-deductible policy. Since I pay the first $500 out of my own pocket, I also shop around when I need medicine or treatment -- you'd be shocked at how much costs vary.

If all Americans had health plans like mine -- if everyone shopped around and managed their employer's health care dollars as though they were their own dollars -- our health costs would be significantly less than they are.

If Americans knew what health care, taxes and the burdens of hiring full-timers really cost, they'd be more appreciative and sensible about the way they manage their affairs -- and certainly more sensible about which politicians they put into office.

In any event, CNNMoney.com says the percentage of contract workers is soaring. In 2005, roughly 31 percent of U.S. workers made their income as self-employed contractors. Experts say that number could increase to well beyond 40 percent in the next 10 years.

Which would do our country good.

Imagine a country rife with opportunity -- a country in which the majority of workers ask for nothing but the opportunity to compete and produce.

Imagine a country in which the harder you work, the more you earn.

Imagine a country in which the majority of citizens fully comprehend how government policy affects the economy -- fully comprehend how bad government will cost them.

If only we could create a country like that -- again.

Companies might become so prosperous that they'd finally start hiring full-timers again.

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