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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 22, 2007 / 13 Tamuz, 5767

A modest proposal for marriage insurance

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When we had our taxes figured, our accountant mentioned his daughter was getting married this summer. He said the rental cost for chairs alone was approaching several thousand dollars.


He explained the guests would need chairs by the Canal Plaza where the ceremony would be, and then they would need chairs inside where the reception would be.


Our accountant's idea — and granted he's a CPA, not a wedding planner, but it made perfect sense to us — was to assign each guest a chair and tell them to keep it with them at all times.


"Of course, a BYOC event," I mused. "Bring your own chair."


"Exactly," he said.


His daughter didn't go for it, and, call it coincidence, but our fee for this year's tax service jumped considerably.


I have been thinking of calling our accountant to let him know about something called wedding insurance.


Responding to the rising cost of weddings, companies now offer liability coverage and coverage for non-refundable deposits. If a tornado rips the roof off the banquet hall, not to worry. Your deposit is as good as in the mail. If the board of health shuts down the caterer, if Uncle Walt dislocates vertebrae doing "Twist and Shout," if all the wedding photos are out of focus, it's all covered.


A reader familiar with wedding insurance, and at the end of a painful divorce, asked what an insurance policy for a marriage might look like.


A marriage policy would definitely provide structural coverage. In the event a man and woman fell victim to unexpected hardship that caused their marriage to implode, the insurance company would send Marv and Betty from Jersey City to live with them.


Having been married for 37 years, raised four kids (one with a severe disability) and run a dry cleaning business that went bust twice and was torched once, Marv and Betty would be a daily reminder that obstacles can be overcome.


The personal belongings clause of a marriage policy would cover wardrobe, sports equipment, the remote control, furniture, jewelry, cars, debit and credit cards. Should incessant bickering over material goods result in a claim, the insurance policy would automatically enable the couple to be embedded with troops in Iraq for six months.


A marriage policy would not cover abuse, abandonment or serial adultery, but it would offer liability protection for damage caused by the mouth. This would cover destruction due to a bellicose tone, brutal sarcasm, yelling, sniping, carping, and mean-spirited jokes.


Such liability coverage would be offered, but few could afford it.


The only thing close to marriage insurance is nestled in the wedding vows. It's that part when the starry-eyed couple pledges faithfulness for better or worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness and in health.


It's not insurance, and it's not a guarantee, but it's a vow, and that's as close as any two human beings can come.


It is much easier to insure a wedding than a marriage. But why wouldn't it be? They are two entirely different things.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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