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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 16, 2006 / 19 Sivan, 5766

Dads to be grateful for

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | My father is a man for whom the glass is always half full. Maybe even more than half.

I have often wondered if this attitude comes from being a boy during the Depression or from serving in the infantry during World War II. Perhaps it comes from growing up on a farm with eight brothers and sisters, resourceful parents, open skies and rolling prairies.

Or perhaps it is simply the way G-d made him.

"It's not the problem that matters, it's how you deal with the problem that matters," he has always said.

It was no surprise that when the doctor told him he had a mass on his pancreas, he met it head on, like a soldier in full gear, determined to make it over the next hill.

After the initial diagnosis, my 79-year-old dad came home from the med center, fired up the Weed Eater, and trimmed the yard while my brother mowed. He called me that night and said, "You know, we're all going to die. Even the doctors are going to die." He says this with a soft chuckle, mildly amused by the irony of it all.

"The doctor says I'm as healthy as a 55-year-old man. But I want to say to him, 'If I'm so healthy, why do I have cancer?'" Then he laughs a robust laugh that nearly shatters the phone.

"Your mom and I had 13 great years of retirement. Thirteen years of good health, enjoying ourselves, traveling. My dad never had a single day of retirement. Not one. We have a lot to be grateful for."

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That's another standard line for him — we have a lot to be grateful for — and he means it. Learning of his cancer has not prompted him to re-examine his life and make drastic changes. He has always appreciated each day and lived it to the fullest.

I have spent considerable time with my dad in recent weeks, looking at old pictures and letters together, taking walks, watching finches at the feeder, deadheading roses, washing the car, listening to the big band sounds of Sammy Kaye and Guy Lombardo, or Bob Wills, the king of Western swing. Dad knows the words to all the standards . . . "Molly and me, and the baby makes three. We're happy in my Blue Heaven."

My father is a man dearly loved and deeply respected. Like many men of his generation, he has earned these honors by simply being there. By being reliable and dependable, the kind of man you can count on, the kind of man who looks you in the eye, whose word is good and whose handshake is firm.

In the evenings, I sometimes overhear him on the phone, talking to far away friends and family members who have called to inquire. He tells them the news and that he has "limited time," never in a morose way, or with a hint of self-pity, but in a simply stated, matter-of-fact way.

Dad does not finish a phone call without asking about the caller. What's happening with you? How are your kids? Your grandkids? And then he again assures them that he is great, just great.

He is great. He is a great man, a great friend, a great father and grandfather.

If you have been blessed to know a dad who is anything like mine, well, we have a lot to be grateful for.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2006, Lori Borgman

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