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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 7, 2013/ 27 Iyar, 5773

We knew Jackie Robinson, and Jason Collins is no Jackie Robinson

By Christine M. Flowers

Christine M. Flowers


http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) The cartoon that was widely disseminated this week depicting Jackie Robinson hugging Jason Collins completely distorts the significance of Robinson's legacy and Collins' act.

We're all aware of the social juggernaut that is the gay rights movement. Anyone who refuses to stand up (or come out) and support same-sex marriage, public funding for gender reassignment operations, punitive actions against the Boy Scouts and the inclusion of gay-friendly provisions in immigration legislation is a bigot. Just ask, well, everyone who has ever appeared on MSNBC or written a screed at Huffington Post.

But just because society is allegedly evolving to the point where everyone whose knuckles don't scrape the ground think gender distinctions are irrelevant and Heather deserves two (or more) daddies, this does not mean that we can twist history to our liking. While it took some courage to admit to the world that he was sexually attracted to men, Jason Collins is no more or less a hero than Tim Tebow who took a few shots because he believed in G0D and wasn't afraid to pray in public.

Jackie Robinson is another story altogether. Anyone who has seen the recent biopic "42" has some idea of what the great Dodger was forced to endure as the man who single-handedly integrated American's national pastime. As a Philadelphian who was not fully aware of the treatment he received at the hands of our hometown club, I was horrified to hear the words that, in other times, were launched as easily and expertly as a flyball out of Shibe Park.

And of course, it wasn't just words. Robinson was a social pariah among his own teammates, unable to ride on the same buses or lodge in the same hotels as his less-talented colleagues. Beyond the world of baseball, he would not have been able to walk down a southern street without having to worry about his personal safety. He was a black man at a time when the color of your skin put you at risk for harassment, or much worse. He couldn't hide it, and no one really cared about the content of his character.

Regardless of how much we try and analogize his ordeal to that of Jason Collins, it doesn't compute. While there is no question that being gay in professional sports is not an idyllic experience, it is hardly the purgatory that Jackie Robinson suffered every day of his major league life. This is particularly so in the 21st century where a guy like Tebow is more likely to be ridiculed for his genuflections than a sexually emancipated athlete who has the support of presidents and movie stars. I don't remember anyone coming to the defense of Tebow when his prayers were obviously not being answered from on high. G0D is clearly not a Jets fan. I do, however, remember the late night crowd making fun of the Heisman winner.

No one would dare treat Collins with anything other than respect, even in the sweaty locker rooms which are the temple of his own faith. We have speech codes, explicit or implicit, that forbid us from using the word 'gay' in a pejorative manner. We have laws that forbid us from asking about a person's sexual orientation, or firing a teacher-at a Catholic school no less-who is openly living with her 'partner.' This is a society that has become increasingly gay-friendly, and while that is a good thing from a compassionate perspective, it hardly supports the view that coming out on the gridiron or ice rink or basketball court is an act of courage.

But it plays into the narrative that we are forced to read, the one where only preferred minorities are courageous while others are either forgotten or ridiculed. If I were an African American watching the Collins affair, I'd be annoyed beyond belief at the suggestion that what my ancestors suffered was equal to the deprivation of 'marriage equality.'

And they're not the only ones. I'm personally outraged that the LGBT lobby is ready to sink immigration reform by its insistence on pushing for 'same-sex' visas for foreign born partners, fully aware that this will guarantee a veto on the whole bill from conservative legislators who are already gun shy about helping 'illegals.'

There is nothing wrong with supporting human dignity. It is the basis for our secular democratic prayer "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

But we do ourselves a great disservice when we try and equalize all struggles and histories simply because it fits our evolving sense of who we should be.

Jason Collins is, indeed, a brave man. But he's no Jackie Robinson.

Christine M. Flowers is a lawyer and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Comments by clicking here.

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Previously:



05/01/13: Blame pro-choice lobby for Philly monster
04/23/13: Of damnation, and staring back
04/15/13: Margaret Thatcher changed the world, and didnít have to be a feminist to do it
04/08/13: Taking great pleasure in the death penalty
04/01/13: An easy prediction --- bet on the unpredictable
03/26/13: 'The personal is political' is no reason to change
03/19/13: A word to the whines --- it was just some high jinks
03/11/13: The Great Race Debate, revisited
03/04/13: Marriage goes beyond love
02/19/13: 2 women, and what they're fighting for
02/04/13: Sadly, Scouting seems poised to give up the fight
01/15/13: Reflections from Gettysburg
01/02/13: The mentally ill vs. those who love them
12/27/12: Rapper learns he's just another guy on probation
12/20/12: Cold, hard truth about the killer
12/10/12: When a warm heart meets a cold manipulator
11/22/12: Some women don't know how good they have it


© 2013, Philadelphia Daily News. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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