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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 3, 2012/ 11 Iyar, 5772

Driving country roads helps restore hope

By Sharon Randall




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | In 10 days, I traveled to five states (six, if you count Nevada, where I live) in three time zones, to speak at five, count 'em, separate events.

For some people -- politicians and touring musicians and wanted felons on the lam -- this might seem purely routine.

I am not one of those people. Nor do I know any of them personally. But I will say this: Whoever they are, wherever they roam, I hope they remember to carry change for vending machines. Late at night, when things close up tighter than last year's stretch pants, quarters are your best friends.

I spoke first in Bristol, Tenn., at an awards ceremony for community volunteers, and the next day, at the public library in Bristol, Va. It was 34 degrees, with snow flurries, and I had not taken a jacket. Or socks.

In Abilene, Texas, I spoke at the 25th anniversary of Disability Resources Inc., a wonderful organization that provides housing and other services for developmentally disabled adults. It was 103 degrees, and I was wearing wool.

Finally, I spoke in my home state of North Carolina, at a pair of fundraisers for literacy and other programs sponsored by the Mocksville Woman's Club.

It was chilly and overcast, so much so that people in the audiences (who had read my last column about traveling a little too light) presented me with umbrellas and socks.

I am not making that up. Talk about Southern hospitality. At one event, someone posed a question that stumped me. I'd been talking about the way things were when I was growing up, how folks went to church, families gathered for dinner and children played tag instead of texting on cellphones.

The question, in effect, was this: What can we do to ensure that the lives of our children and grandchildren will be enriched, not diminished, by technology?

The best answer I could think of was a story I'd heard about a woman who insisted that cellphones and other gadgets had to be dropped in a basket at the door until dinner was over.

I liked that idea a lot. But it seemed a rather small answer for such a big question.

Sunday morning, I put on all my new socks, packed up my umbrellas, checked out of the hotel and began driving south from Mocksville to Landrum, S.C., to spend a week visiting my sister and other family.

To drive down I-85 would've taken three hours, more or less, but I'd had my fill of freeways. So I got off the big-rig beaten path and picked my way over winding, country roads.

I wish you could've ridden with me. Carolina is green most all year 'round, but in spring, it turns a paler shade with buds of new growth, offset by bursts of creamy-white dogwoods and neon-pink azaleas.

I saw a dozen or so churches where parking lots were filled and men stood on the steps smoking and joking.

I passed countless houses in which families had apparently gathered for Sunday dinner, spilling over onto porches and into yards, where children ran laughing, chasing each other.

I was tempted to stop, just to say hello, but I had family of my own awaiting my arrival.

I took a few wrong turns (quite a few, really), but on the whole I felt a lot more found than lost.

What can we do to ensure that the lives of our children and grandchildren will be enriched, not diminished, by technology?

I still don't know the answer. But I do have a little more hope.

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Previously:


Confessions of a bad-weather magnet

The new star of my husband's harem

Shared family moments are precious, irreplaceable

What I'll remember from serving on the jury in a murder case

When someone walks into your life and never lets you go

Look for beauty

We can't always 'be there' when we're needed

Picture-perfect memories

To love someone is to want to hear all their stories

With age should come at least some wisdom

A story for my grandson

Regretting she didn't help out a woman in need

Post-holiday-visit blues

For 2012, tuck some hope into your wallet

The measure of a time well spent is not where you went or what you did. It's the way you smile remembering it

Treating people we love like the Jello salad at Thanksgiving dinner

We all need something or someone to pull for

Hold on to treasured words, don't trust memory

A storybook princess

Love reaches forward, never back

How to Watch a Sunset

Waiting often comes with gifts

An exceptional book club

There is no guilt in moving forward

Celebrations full of love and buttercream

It takes a whole village of shoes to raise a child

The best stories always tell us who we are

Stop, look back . . . and listen

The great outdoors, if one's lucky, a rock-solid companion

An iChat with my grandson

Lightening bugs and other things make us glow

Each and every Fourth of July a cause for celebration



© 2012, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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