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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 7, 2010 / 23 Iyar 5770

Another look at the iPad

By Mark Kellner



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | On May 3, Apple, Inc. reported an interesting, if not amazing, statistic: the firm had "sold its one millionth iPad on [April 30], just 28 days after its introduction on April 3. iPad users have already downloaded over 12 million app[lication]s from the App Store and over 1.5 million e-books from the new iBookstore," a statement indicated.


"One million iPads in 28 days--that's less than half of the 74 days it took to achieve this milestone with iPhone," said Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO, in the statement. "Demand continues to exceed supply and we're working hard to get this magical product into the hands of even more customers."


OK, so Mr. Jobs might be allowed just a soupcon of hyperbole, his firm having accomplished something of this magnitude. (Industry insiders say approximately 300,000 of those one million iPads are the new model with 3G wireless data capabilities as well as Wi-Fi access, by the way.) But any hype doesn't diminish the accomplishment: this is an amazing device, and your columnist, apparently, isn't the only one who feels that way.


Just as the iPhone created a new market for applications and, indeed, new kinds of software applications, the iPad is doing the same thing. E-books aren't necessarily flooding out in the ways some would hope - more on that in a moment - but they are coming. At the same time, I suspect many of the 1.5 million e-books downloaded from the "iBookstore" are of the free variety, i.e., "public domain" titles adapted to the Apple e-book format. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but it's something to keep in mind.


But along with "The Last of the Mohicans," the iPad is (and will continue to be) a platform where you can find interesting content displayed in interesting ways. I'm impressed with several efforts to bring print content to the iPad: Zinio's magazine reader for the iPad is a great product; now all we need are more titles in the iPad format, something I'm sure the firm is working on. Ditto for PixelMags reader, and a gaggle of others.


The biggest form of print-to-pixel conversion, however, is the very standard Portable Document Format, or PDF, pioneered by Adobe Corp.'s Acrobat software and available through any number of means. Several magazines, National Review among them, offer a PDF as well as printed version to subscribers. And, of course, you and I probably get an armload of PDFs via e-mail each week.


How to read all these? My personal favorite, so far, is GoodReader from Good.iSoftware, online at http://www.goodiware.com/goodreader.html. It'll set you back all of 99-cents, but once you've linked to an online file server such as Apple's MobileMe, you can wirelessly download PDFs and read away to your heart's content. The program will also allow transfers from your desktop computer via a USB-to-iPad synchronization cable.


Apart from price, GoodReader's assets include an easy way to navigate through PDF documents and a convenient index of the titles you have. It's software that works, and works well. What more could you hope for?


Among news organizations, National Public Radio, USA Today and The Wall Street Journal have, in my view, done an outstanding job of bringing news to their audiences via the iPad. NPR's free application, much like USA Today's free app, pulls a wide range of content together and offers a clear view. The USA Today app very much mimics a print newspaper layout, with the ability to "jump" to stories and sections quite easily. The Wall Street Journal will not only "deliver" that day's paper, but also provide the latest news in a separate update. However, you must be a paid subscriber to access all of the Journal's content.


On the day this column was written, a "pitch" came in from a public relations firm: Would I want to review a new, off-brand e-book reader? No thanks, I said, the iPad has settled that question. As the remarkable sales figures from Apple confirm, this new device delivers content writ large, and I'm still convinced we're only at the beginning.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

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