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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 22, 2007 / 5 Sivan, 5767

The newly troubled immigration policy

By Kathryn Lopez


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | I've come to hate immigration, which is an awful thing for any American — and one named Lopez at that — to admit. Immigration should be an inspirational topic about "huddled masses yearning to breathe free." But in 2007, it's not: It's a contentious, unserious, dangerous topic.


Maybe I've caught Bush Derangement Syndrome. I'd like to believe I have, since that will alleviate my guilt a little. I hate being one of the Bush administration detractors. There's a war going on, and the stakes are just too high to be fooling around and compromising a commander in chief's authority unnecessarily.


I'll compromise where I have to. I'll put up with bad judgment here and there: Harriet Miers? The incompetent Alberto Gonzales? Torching the First Amendment by signing campaign-finance reform? Things like the war are so important that it is easier to look past previous gaffes. He knows there's an enemy out there that hates America.


But Immigration is about the war, too. It's literally our first line of defense. Who gets in and out? Who is here? These are pretty fundamental questions in a country where there are already an estimated 12 million illegal immigrants. And yet, the president, instead of taking such concerns seriously, engages in immature name-calling.


On the day a deal between Senate leaders and the White House was announced, President Bush said that the bill will be without "animosity." He aimed that at this Lopez — a critic. Supposedly, the attitude goes, if you're not with Jorge Arbusto, you're filled with anti-Hispanic, anti-immigrant "animosity."


Speaking to a Hispanic group earlier this year, key amnesty proponent South Carolina senator Lindsay Graham proclaimed: "We're gonna tell the bigots to shut up."


That condescending attitude has led the White House to cast aside many an ally — most notably Texas senator John Cornyn, who stands out among senators as a smart conservative who defends the White House ably on the cable news rounds. And yet, during negotiations toward the deal that was eventually struck, Cornyn's concerns were not taken seriously, if the buzz is to be believed.


Instead of being the loyal ally the White House so badly needed, Cornyn was forced to be skeptical within hours of the deal's announcement: "I simply cannot, and will not, support any legislation that repeats the mistakes of the 1986 amnesty." Even before the details of the compromise became clear, a source close to Cornyn told me that the senator had serious reservations; the implication was that he had absolutely no reason to trust the judgment of the White House.


Cornyn wanted to see real enforcement safeguards in the bill — targeting businesses that hire illegal aliens. He wanted, in other words, to be confident there would be some law enforcement in this bill. But his pleas fell on deaf ears.


This deal came just days after Newsweek reported that three of the four suspects who plotted to kill U.S. troops at Fort Dix in New Jersey were in the U.S. illegally. You'd think the president would take the time to address such serious concerns in a serious manner — especially when they are raised by respected allies like Cornyn. Instead, he announced a plan that met with the approval of pro-amnesty groups, one that could cost the U.S. taxpayer $2.5 trillion in retirement benefits alone, according to the Heritage Foundation's Robert Rector. Nice deal if you're not a law-abiding American.


As initial details emerged about the immigration deal, conservatives were demoralized. Readers of my conservative Web site e-mailed me using the "I" word — impeachment. Most weren't serious; but all were genuinely concerned. When Republicans like George W. Bush, and even the beloved conservative Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, give in to a vast amnesty plan, how much worse could the Democrats be? I hate the immigration issue for many reasons, but most practically because it may have just won the Democrats the presidency in 2008.

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